Rangers act early, exercise Adrian Beltre’s $16 million option for 2016

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Adrian Beltre’s contract includes a $16 million option for 2016 that would have vested if he reached 586 plate appearances this season, but the Rangers have decided to exercise the option early.

If healthy Beltre is a no-brainer to keep for $16 million, as he’s consistently been one of the elite third basemen in baseball for more than a decade and last season hit .324 with 19 homers and an .879 OPS in 148 games. Of course, there’s some “you never know what might happen” risk to exercising the option early, as there would be with any 36-year-old player.

As for why the Rangers did it now, general manager Jon Daniels indicated that he didn’t want the plate appearance count to become a distraction and, perhaps more importantly, there’s speculation that the two sides are working on a contract extension that would stretch beyond 2016.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.