What they’re saying about the new pace of play rules

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Baseball’s new pace of play rules were officially announced on Friday. Among the changes: batters will be expected to keep one foot in the batter’s box unless one of a handful of events occur (such as swinging or bunting); a stricter timing of breaks between innings and pitching changes; and managers can issue a replay challenge from the dugout. Craig went over the changes in much greater detail here, so make sure you check that out.

With players reporting to camp, some of the various writers decided to collect some opinions on the new changes from those affected by it most. Here’s a sampling from the Nationals and Brewers, via Chelsea Janes of the Washington Post and Todd Rosiak of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, respectively.

Nationals:

  • Craig Stammen, RP: “It’ll be a good thing. I don’t think it’s a big deal to speed the process up a bit instead of just jacking around wasting time.”
  • Casey Janssen, RP: “To say that a certain pitcher has to run with a certain tempo to get to the mound so he gets his allotted warm-up pitches is such a silly rule, especially if at the end of the day you want to make sure he’s loose so he doesn’t get an arm injury.”

Brewers:

  • Jonathan Lucroy, C: “It bothers me to see that because as a hitter when you rush in the game of baseball, it’s not going to work out. I like taking my time, relaxing, gathering my thoughts. This game is tough enough without being up there rushing.”
  • Kyle Lohse, SP: “I understand trying to speed up the game. I mean, I don’t like sitting through a 3-, 3½-hour game on the bench. I get on some of our younger pitchers when they take too much time in between because you should already have an idea of what you want to do.”

Carlos Carrasco pitches during game action

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Indians starter Carlos Carrasco was diagnosed with leukemia earlier this summer. He’d been out since June. Despite that diagnosis, he and the Indians insisted that he would make every effort to come back this year. Yesterday he took a big step in that direction, making his first rehab appearance at Double-A Akron.

He only tossed one inning, walking one batter and striking out another. He thew 16 pitches but cranked it up to 97 with his first offering. Not too shabby.

It’s unclear what the timetable is for him returning to Cleveland. If they intend to use him as a starter again he’ll obviously need several more appearances to get stretched out. If he’s to be used as a reliever, fewer obviously. What his stamina level is and will be is also an open question.

However that gets sorted out, it’s good so have him back in action.