What they’re saying about the new pace of play rules

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Baseball’s new pace of play rules were officially announced on Friday. Among the changes: batters will be expected to keep one foot in the batter’s box unless one of a handful of events occur (such as swinging or bunting); a stricter timing of breaks between innings and pitching changes; and managers can issue a replay challenge from the dugout. Craig went over the changes in much greater detail here, so make sure you check that out.

With players reporting to camp, some of the various writers decided to collect some opinions on the new changes from those affected by it most. Here’s a sampling from the Nationals and Brewers, via Chelsea Janes of the Washington Post and Todd Rosiak of the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, respectively.

Nationals:

  • Craig Stammen, RP: “It’ll be a good thing. I don’t think it’s a big deal to speed the process up a bit instead of just jacking around wasting time.”
  • Casey Janssen, RP: “To say that a certain pitcher has to run with a certain tempo to get to the mound so he gets his allotted warm-up pitches is such a silly rule, especially if at the end of the day you want to make sure he’s loose so he doesn’t get an arm injury.”

Brewers:

  • Jonathan Lucroy, C: “It bothers me to see that because as a hitter when you rush in the game of baseball, it’s not going to work out. I like taking my time, relaxing, gathering my thoughts. This game is tough enough without being up there rushing.”
  • Kyle Lohse, SP: “I understand trying to speed up the game. I mean, I don’t like sitting through a 3-, 3½-hour game on the bench. I get on some of our younger pitchers when they take too much time in between because you should already have an idea of what you want to do.”

Video: Zack Greinke homers off of Clayton Kershaw

Jennifer Stewart/Getty Images
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Diamondbacks starter Zack Greinke continued to swing a good stick, belting his third homer of the season on Monday night against the Dodgers. With the game tied 3-3 in the second inning, Greinke lined a 1-1 Clayton Kershaw fastball over the fence in left field for a solo homer.

Greinke is the third pitcher to homer off of Kershaw, joining Madison Bumgarner and Tyson Ross. He’s No. 4 if you count Brandon Woodruff‘s home run in Game 1 of the NLCS last year. Greinke now has three homers on the season, setting a career-high. He’s batting .314/.351/.686 with six RBI, seven runs scored, and a stolen base along with the trio of dingers. Absurd numbers from a pitcher.