Jayson Werth on jail: “It’s not something that was fun. It’s not a destination you would choose.”

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Jayson Werth recently served some time in the pokey for reckless driving (they’re serious about that in Northern Virginia). He spoke with Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post about his experience:

“It’s a time in my life that I’m glad it’s behind me . . . I’ve learned my lesson. I don’t recommend the experience I had to anyone, really. It’s not something that was fun. It’s not a destination you would choose.”

It is a destination, however, which has caused Werth to want to focus more on being a good citizen. He tells Kilgore, “I don’t want to be looked at as some renegade in the community . . . I live here.” And he has made good on that, substantially ramping up his charitable work both before and after he served his five days in jail. And no, there was no ulterior motive there. It was after he was sentenced. He seems to really want to do some good.

That’s admirable, as is his vow to be more respectful of the laws. But, at the same time, one wonders if he actually understands how dangerous it is to drive 105 m.p.h. on an urban freeway:

“On some level, in our society, people want you to be sorry — say sorry and apologize — that sort of thing,” Werth said. “I would think that I’m sorry if I let anybody down. But I don’t feel like I put anybody in danger.”

The baseball media just spent two days picking apart Alex Rodriguez’s apology. Any of those folks want to take a crack at this one? Anyone?

Oh well. Good for Werth for doing his time and trying to turn it into a good. And good for Kilgore for getting what is truly an interesting story out of it. A good read. Go check it out.

Max Scherzer, with broken nose, strikes out 10 Phillies over seven shutout innings

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Nationals starter Max Scherzer bunted a ball into his face during batting practice on Tuesday, breaking his nose in the process. He ended up with a gnarly looking shiner around his right eye, making him appear a bit like Terminator. Scherzer still took the ball to start the second game of Wednesday night’s doubleheader against the Phillies.

Despite the injury, Scherzer was incredibly effective, limiting the Phillies to four hits and two walks across seven shutout innings, striking out 10 batters in the process. He might even have had some extra adrenaline going, as he averaged 96.2 MPH on his fastball, his highest average fastball velocity in a game since September 2012, per MLB.com’s Jamal Collier. The Nationals provided Scherzer with just one run of support, coming on a Brian Dozier solo home run off of Jake Arrieta in the second inning, but it was enough.

Wander Suero worked a scoreless top of the eighth with a pair of strikeouts. Victor Robles added a solo homer off of Pat Neshek in the bottom half. Closer Sean Doolittle took over in the ninth, working a 1-2-3 frame to give the Nats their 2-0 victory.

Over his last six starts, Scherzer now has a 0.88 ERA with a 59/8 K/BB ratio across 41 innings. He has gone six innings, struck out at least nine batters, and held the opposition to two or fewer runs in each of those six starts.