Jayson Werth on jail: “It’s not something that was fun. It’s not a destination you would choose.”

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Jayson Werth recently served some time in the pokey for reckless driving (they’re serious about that in Northern Virginia). He spoke with Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post about his experience:

“It’s a time in my life that I’m glad it’s behind me . . . I’ve learned my lesson. I don’t recommend the experience I had to anyone, really. It’s not something that was fun. It’s not a destination you would choose.”

It is a destination, however, which has caused Werth to want to focus more on being a good citizen. He tells Kilgore, “I don’t want to be looked at as some renegade in the community . . . I live here.” And he has made good on that, substantially ramping up his charitable work both before and after he served his five days in jail. And no, there was no ulterior motive there. It was after he was sentenced. He seems to really want to do some good.

That’s admirable, as is his vow to be more respectful of the laws. But, at the same time, one wonders if he actually understands how dangerous it is to drive 105 m.p.h. on an urban freeway:

“On some level, in our society, people want you to be sorry — say sorry and apologize — that sort of thing,” Werth said. “I would think that I’m sorry if I let anybody down. But I don’t feel like I put anybody in danger.”

The baseball media just spent two days picking apart Alex Rodriguez’s apology. Any of those folks want to take a crack at this one? Anyone?

Oh well. Good for Werth for doing his time and trying to turn it into a good. And good for Kilgore for getting what is truly an interesting story out of it. A good read. Go check it out.

Pirates hire Ben Cherington as their new general manager

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The Pittsburgh Pirates have hired Ben Cherington as the team’s new general manager. They do so after the general manager meetings ended, but better late than never.

Cherington served as GM of the Boston Red Sox for four years, winning the World Series in 2013, but resigned during the 2015 season after Dave Dombrowski was named Boston’s new president of baseball operations. Which was a defacto demotionn for Cherington who, until then, had the final say in baseball decisions. Dombrowski, of course, was fired late in the season this year. Cherington went on to work for the Toronto Blue Jays as a vice president, but was seen as biding his time for another GM position. Now he has one.

Cherington takes over in Pittsburgh for executive vice president and general manager Neal Huntington, who was fired after a 12 years at the helm. Also fired was team president Frank Coonelly. Travis Williams replaced Coonelly recently. While the Pirates experienced a few years of contention under Huntington and Coonelly, they have slid out of contention in recent years as the club has traded away promising players for little return, all while cutting payroll. There’s a very big rebuilding job ahead of Cherington.

The first move he’ll have to make: hire a manager, as the team still hasn’t replaced Clint Hurdle since he was dismissed in the final weekend of the regular season.