Jayson Werth talks about his time in jail for reckless driving

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Nationals outfielder Jayson Werth recently completed a five-day jail sentence in Fairfax County, Virginia for a reckless driving charge. He talked about his experience with Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post and it’s well worth a read if you have a few minutes:

In his first public comments addressing his conviction and jail sentence, Werth recalled that story and reflected on an experience he never expected. The jail time did not change him, he said, but it did add perspective, both deep and practical. The experience left him with a more acute appreciation of friends, family, teammates and fans. It implanted a newfound desire to volunteer at local charities. It gave him, to be clear, a full grasp of Virginia’s driving laws and penalties. He seemed penitent, if not necessarily remorseful. He is eager to keep the lessons and leave the rest.

“It’s a time in my life that I’m glad it’s behind me,” Werth said in a telephone conversation Wednesday night. “I’ve had time to reflect on the whole thing. I want to talk about it one time, and kind of lay it to rest. I’m ready to put it behind me. I’ve learned my lesson. I don’t recommend the experience I had to anyone, really. It’s not something that was fun. It’s not a destination you would choose.”

By the way, that story about an inmate getting Werth’s autograph in jail? It was legitimate.

Werth ultimately didn’t feel like he “put anybody in danger” despite going 105 mph in a 55 mph zone, stating that there was “no one around on the Beltway.” Of course, that doesn’t justify his actions and it seems like he learned something from the experience and will try to be a better member of his community moving forward. That’s a pretty good outcome.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
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Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.