We should all hope to “botch” things like James Shields did

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Jeff Passan of Yahoo Sports has a column about how James Shields ended up signing a four-year, $75 million deal with the Padres after remaining on the open market far longer than anyone expected.

In tweeting out a link to the article, Passan calls it “a botched strategy” by Shields’ behalf:

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There’s some truth to that, certainly (and Passan’s column is a solid one, as are most of his columns). Almost every free agency prediction had Shields signing for more than $75 million and Shields himself probably wasn’t counting on taking four years from San Diego.

But he’s obviously not the first free agent to overestimate his market value and here’s the thing: That’s a helluva “botched strategy.” Shields botched himself into …

1. Living in San Diego, which is one of the nicest places in the country and is where the California native already makes his home during the offseason. I mean, think of how often we hear about how some free agent wants to play in his hometown. Shields actually did it.

2. Playing in the majors’ most pitcher-friendly ballpark, Petco Park, which will help his raw numbers look much better than they actually are and keep any mid-30s decline from being as severe-looking. It’s basically like a free agent hitter signing with the Rockies to play 81 times a year at Coors Field.

3. Being paid $75 million, which is a lot of money–third-most among all free agent pitchers this year behind Max Scherzer and Jon Lester–and probably has the exact same impact on Shields’ lifestyle that being paid, say, $100 million would have had.

Passan is absolutely right that Shields’ offseason didn’t go as planned, but we should all wish for that kind of “botched strategy.”

Video: Kurt Suzuki breaks World Series Game 2 tie with long solo homer

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The postseason has a knack for finding unlikely heroes. Nationals catcher Kurt Suzuki was 1-for-23 in the postseason entering Wednesday’s Game 2 of the World Series. The Nats and Astros each plated two runs in the first inning, then went otherwise scoreless through the sixth inning. In the top of the seventh, with Justin Verlander returning to the mound, Suzuki demolished a high, 1-0 fastball just below the train tracks in left field at Minute Maid Park, breaking the 2-2 tie.

Verlander proceeded to walk Victor Robles, prompting manager A.J. Hinch to take his veteran starter out of the game. Ryan Pressly came in to attempt to keep it a one-run game.

The underdog Nationals held on to defeat the Astros 5-4 in Game 1. Another victory by the Nats in Game 2 would put the Astros — heavy favorites according to oddsmakers — in a big hole.

Update: Pressly walked the first batter he faced, Trea Turner. Adam Eaton successfully sacrifice bunted both runners over. After Anthony Rendon flied out to shallow center field, Hinch decided to issue his team’s first intentional walk of the entire year to Juan Soto, loading the bases. Howie Kendrick then hit what appeared to be an inning-ending ground out, but Alex Bregman booted the ball as he moved to his left. Turner scored to make it 4-2. The floodgates opened when Asdrúbal Cabrera lined a single to center field, bringing home two more runs to pad the lead to 6-2. While pitching to Ryan Zimmerman, Pressly uncorked a wild pitch to allow the two base runners to advance. Zimmerman followed up with a slow roller down the third base line which Bregman barehanded and proceeded to throw away. Two more runs scored. 8-2. Yiiiikes, Astros.