Chris Davis opens up about his Adderall suspension: “It was a moment of weakness”

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Orioles slugger Chris Davis was on hand for the team’s annual FanFest today and opened up about the 25-game Adderall suspension which put an end to his disappointing 2014 campaign and left him on the sidelines during the playoffs.

Davis was suspended because he was found to have tested positive on two occasions for Adderall. Players are allowed to take the drug if they receive a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) from MLB. This is something Davis had in previous years, but for some reason he didn’t have it last year.

According to Rich Dubroff of CSNBaltimore.com, below is part of Davis’ explanation:

“I took it a couple of times. It was a moment of weakness,” Davis said. “I wish I could go back and undo it.”

Davis, who fell back sharply from his 53 home run season in 2013, said that Adderall helps him concentrate because he has Attention Deficit Disorder. It’s not a performance-enhancer, he says.

“It was never a baseball issue. It was an everyday life thing,” Davis said.

Obviously many beg to differ about whether Adderall is a performance-enhancer. Davis, who was originally diagnosed with ADD in 2008, has a TUE for Adderall this year. He still has one game remaining on his suspension from last year, so he will have to sit out Opening Day before rejoining the Orioles lineup. However, he will be eligible to play during spring training.

Brian Anderson suffers hand fracture on a hit-by-pitch

Brian Anderson
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Marlins infielder/outfielder Brian Anderson departed Friday’s 19-11 win over the Phillies with a left hand contusion, the club announced. Following an X-ray, it was then revealed that he had sustained a fracture of the fifth metacarpal — an injury severe enough that it’ll likely keep him off the field for the remainder of the 2019 season.

Anderson suffered the injury on a hit-by-pitch in the third inning. On the first pitch of the at-bat, with the bases loaded and one out, he took a 93.9-m.p.h. fastball off his left hand. The HBP forced in a run, but he doubled over in pain and was quickly examined by a member of the Marlins’ staff before officially departing the game in the top of the fourth.

It’s an unfortunate way to end Anderson’s third campaign with the Marlins. The 26-year-old has posted some career-high numbers this year, reaching the 20-homer mark for the first time and batting a healthy .261/.342/.468 with an .810 OPS and 3.0 fWAR through 510 PA. Despite the setback, he should be fully healed and ready to go well in advance of the Marlins’ spring training in 2020.