54 players exchange figures with their clubs following today’s deadline

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Today was the deadline for teams and players to exchange salary figures in an attempt to avoid arbitration hearings beginning February 1 and ending on the 21st. Players and teams can still work out a deal over the next two weeks.

Here’s a rundown of all of the filings from the players and their respective teams:

[Update: The original count had 56 players but two players were incorrectly left on the list after avoiding arbitration.]

Angels (3)

  • David Freese (3B) filed for $7.6 million, team filed for $5.25 million (source)
  • Matt Joyce (OF) filed for $5.2 million, team filed for $4.2 million (source)
  • Garrett Richards (SP) filed for $3.8 million, team filed for $2.4 million (source)

Astros (2)

  • Dexter Fowler (OF) filed for $10.8 million, team filed for $8.5 million (source)
  • Marwin Gonzalez (SS) filed for $1.4 million, team filed for $900,000 (source, source)

Athletics (4)

  • Fernando Abad (RP) filed for $1.225 million, team filed for $850,000 (source)
  • Tyler Clippard (RP) filed for $8.85 million, team filed for $7.775 million (source)
  • Jarrod Parker (SP) filed for $1.7 million, team filed for $850,000 (source)
  • Eric Sogard (2B) filed for $1.425 million, team filed for $900,000 (source)

Blue Jays (2)

  • Josh Donaldson (3B) filed for $5.75 million, team filed for $4.3 million (source)
  • Danny Valencia (3B) filed for $1.675 million, team filed for $1.25 million (source)

Braves (1)

  • Mike Minor (SP) filed for $5.6 million, team filed for $5.1 million (source)

Cardinals (1)

  • Jon Jay (OF) filed for $5.0 million, team filed for $4.1 million (source)

Cubs (1)

  • Pedro Strop (RP) filed for $3.0 million, team filed for $2.0 million (source)

Diamondbacks (2)

  • Addison Reed (RP) filed for $5.6 million, team filed for $4.7 million (source)
  • Mark Trumbo (OF) filed for $6.9 million, team filed for $5.3 million (source)

Giants (4)

  • Brandon Belt (1B) filed for $4.5 million, team filed for $3.0 million (source)
  • Gregor Blanco (OF) filed for $4.0 million, team filed for $3.3 million (source)
  • Brandon Crawford (SS) filed for $3.95 million, team filed for $2.4 million (source)
  • Casey McGehee (3B) filed for $5.4 million, team filed for $4.0 million (source)

Mariners (1)

  • Tom Wilhelmsen (RP) filed for $2.2 million, team filed for $1.4 million (source)

Marlins (3)

  • Michael Dunn (RP) filed for $2.6 million, team filed for $2.355 million (source)
  • Mat Latos (SP) filed for $10.4 million, team filed for $9.4 million (source)
  • David Phelps (SP) filed for $1.875 million, team filed for $1.4 million (source)

Mets (2)

  • Lucas Duda (1B) filed for $4.7 million, team filed for $3.75 million (source)
  • Jenrry Mejia (RP) filed for $3.0 million, team filed for $2.1 million (source)

Nationals (1)

  • Jerry Blevins (RP) filed for $2.4 million, team filed for $2.2 million (source)

Orioles (6)

  • Zach Britton (RP) filed for $4.2 million, team filed for $2.2 million (source)
  • Alejandro De Aza (OF) filed for $5.65 million, team filed for $5 million (source)
  • Ryan Flaherty (IF) filed for $1.5 million, team filed for $900,000 (source)
  • Miguel Gonzalez (SP) filed for $3.95 million, team filed for $2.5 million (source)
  • Bud Norris (SP) filed for $10.25 million, team filed for $7.5 million (source)
  • Steve Pearce (1B) filed for $5.4 million, team filed for $2 million (source)

Pirates (3)

  • Pedro Alvarez (1B) filed for $5.75 million, team filed for $5.25 million (source)
  • Neil Walker (2B) filed for $9.0 million, team filed for $8.0 million (source)
  • Vance Worley (RP) filed for $2.45 million, team filed for $2.0 million (source)

Rangers (1)

  • Mitch Moreland (DH) filed for $3.35 million, team filed for $2.75 million (source)

Red Sox (2)

  • Wade Miley (SP) filed for $4.3 million, team filed for $3.4 million (source)
  • Daniel Nava (OF) filed for $2.25 million, team filed for $1.3 million (source)

Reds (3)

  • Aroldis Chapman (RP) filed for $8.7 million, team filed for $6.65 million (source)
  • Todd Frazier (3B) filed for $5.7 million, team filed for $3.9 million (source)
  • Devin Mesoraco (C) filed for $3.6 million, team filed for $2.45 million (source)

Rockies (2)

  • Adam Ottavino (RP) filed for $1.475 million, team filed for $1.0 million (source)
  • Wilin Rosario (C) filed for $3.3 million, team filed for $2.8 million (source)

Royals (7)

  • Lorenzo Cain (OF) filed for $3.6 million, team filed for $2 million (source)
  • Danny Duffy (SP) filed for $3.0 million, team filed for $1.75 million (source)
  • Jarrod Dyson (OF) filed for $1.6 million, team filed for $900,000 (source)
  • Kelvin Herrera (RP) filed for $1.9 million, team filed for $1.15 million (source)
  • Greg Holland (RP) filed for $9 million, team filed for $6.65 million (source)
  • Eric Hosmer (1B) filed for $6.7 million, team filed for $4.6 million (source)
  • Mike Moustakas (3B) filed for $3.1 million, team filed for $1.85 million (source)

Tigers (1)

  • Al Alburquerque (RP) filed for $2.05 million, team filed for $1.375 million (source)

Twins (2)

  • Brian Duensing (RP) filed for $3.1 million, team filed for $2.4 million (source)
  • Jordan Schafer (OF) filed for $1.7 million, team filed for $1.4 million (source)

Last year, 40 players exchanged figures with their respective teams.

The Orioles had the two biggest disparities, ending up $3.4 million apart with Steve Pearce ($5.4M vs. $2M) and $2.75 million apart with Bud Norris ($10.25M vs. $7.5M).

MLB crowds jump from ’21, still below pre-pandemic levels

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PHOENIX — Even with the homer heroics of sluggers like Aaron Judge and Albert Pujols, Major League Baseball wasn’t able to coax fans to ballparks at pre-pandemic levels this season, though attendance did jump substantially from the COVID-19 affected campaign in 2021.

The 30 MLB teams drew nearly 64.6 million fans for the regular season that ended Wednesday, which is up from the 45.3 million who attended games in 2021, according to baseball-reference.com. This year’s numbers are still down from the 68.5 million who attended games in 2019, which was the last season that wasn’t affected by the pandemic.

The 111-win Los Angeles Dodgers led baseball with 3.86 million fans flocking to Dodger Stadium for an average of 47,672 per contest. The Oakland Athletics – who lost 102 games, play in an aging stadium and are the constant subject of relocation rumors – finished last, drawing just 787,902 fans for an average of less than 10,000 per game.

The St. Louis Cardinals finished second, drawing 3.32 million fans. They were followed by the Yankees (3.14 million), defending World Series champion Braves (3.13 million) and Padres (2.99 million).

The Toronto Blue Jays saw the biggest jump in attendance, rising from 805,901 fans to about 2.65 million. They were followed by the Cardinals, Yankees, Mariners, Dodgers, and Mets, which all drew more than a million fans more than in 2021.

The Rangers and Reds were the only teams to draw fewer fans than in 2021.

Only the Rangers started the 2021 season at full capacity and all 30 teams weren’t at 100% until July. No fans were allowed to attend regular season games in 2020.

MLB attendance had been declining slowly for years – even before the pandemic – after hitting its high mark of 79.4 million in 2007. This year’s 64.6 million fans is the fewest in a non-COVID-19 season since the sport expanded to 30 teams in 1998.

The lost attendance has been balanced in some ways by higher viewership on the sport’s MLB.TV streaming service. Viewers watched 11.5 billion minutes of content in 2022, which was a record high and up nearly 10% from 2021.