So, which caps do the Hall of Fame inductees wear on their plaques?

48 Comments

I lost all faith in caps-on-plaques last year when my favorite baseball player of all time decided that he’d rather have a blank cap than wear a Braves cap on his plaque as God and Ted Turner intended. But it’s still a thing people talk about, so let’s talk about what the current crop of inductees should wear. Obviously, a couple of these are no-brainers.

John Smoltz. I eagerly await tomorrow’s New York papers to see which of them refer to “Former Yankee” Randy Johnson and “Former Met” Pedro Martinez in their headlines, but New York isn’t the only provincial sports town around. Indeed, this is one of the best tweets I’ve seen today:

I am going to assume that this is tongue-in-cheek. If it is not, please don’t tell me because I don’t want to hate the world any more than I already do. BRAVES.

Craig Biggio: Dude only played for one team, but that team wore multiple caps during his tenure. For his first six seasons, Biggio wore the classic star-H, but those weren’t his best seasons, even if they featured his best cap. His best years actually came in their worst cap, the no-color flying star cap. I feel like most of us remember him in his late-period cap, however, and if I had to guess, that’s the cap he wears. Not that it’s all that different from the previous one. SOME ASTROS CAP.

source:

Sorry, Dodgers fans. You’re getting a bit uppity lately. Have to remind you that your team didn’t always have a smart front office.

Pedro Martinez: There is some Expos-love for Martinez and, with apologies to my friend Jonah Keri, Expos love can be a pretty irrational thing. We give Expos people a pass on that, though, because they had their team taken away and, well, they’re entitled to be a bit neurotic about things. That stuff aside, however, Pedro’s best seasons were clearly in Boston, as were his most memorable moments. RED SOX.

Randy Johnson: I figured this one would not be controversial, but for whatever reason I have a LOT of people on my Twitter feed today telling me that The Big Unit should wear a Mariners cap on his plaque. Which is ridiculous. He won four straight Cy Youngs and a World Series in his first four season in Arizona. He had only two fewer seasons there than he had in Seattle, but his overall numbers were better in Arizona, and that’s even including two years in his second, decline-era stint there. Maybe we first heard of Randy Johnson as a Mariner and maybe that’s where he truly became The Big Unit, but he became a Hall of Famer in the desert. If he chooses to go in blank like Greg Maddux did (sob) so be it, but if he lets the Hall choose, they had best choose the Dbacks’ ugly-ass early 2000s cap.

Or, heck, maybe the crazy Expos people will take over again:

source:

Royals outfielder Gordon to retire after 14 seasons

Getty Images
1 Comment

Kansas City Royals outfielder Alex Gordon, the former first-round pick whose rollercoaster career took him from near bust to All-Star and Gold Glove winner, announced Thursday he will retire after the season.

Gordon was the second overall pick in the 2005 first-year player draft following a standout career at Nebraska, where he won the Golden Spikes Award as the best amateur in baseball. He made his big league debut two years later and, after a few years shuttling back and forth to the minors, moved from third base to the outfield and finally found success.

He wound up playing his entire 14-year career in Kansas City, joining only George Brett and Frank White as position players with that much longevity with the franchise. He heads into a weekend four-game series against Detroit with the third-most walks (682), fourth-most homers (190), fifth-most doubles (357) and sixth-most games played (1,749) in club history.

The three-time All-Star also holds the dubious distinction of being the Royals’ career leader in getting hit by pitches.

While he never quite hit with the kind of average the Royals hoped he would, Gordon did through sheer grit turn himself into one of the best defensive players in the game. He is the only outfielder to earn seven Gold Gloves in a nine-year span, a number that trails only White’s eight for the most in franchise history, and there are enough replays of him crashing into the outfield wall at Kauffman Stadium or throwing out a runner at the plate to run for hours.

Gordon won the first of three defensive player of the year awards in 2014, when he helped Kansas City return to the World Series for the first time since its 1985 championship. The Royals wound up losing to the Giants in a seven-game thriller, but they returned to the Fall Classic the following year and beat the Mets in five games to win the World Series.

It was during the 2015 that Gordon hit one of the iconic homers in Royals history. His tying shot off Mets closer Jeurys Familia in Game 1 forced extra innings, and the Royals won in 14 to set the tone for the rest of the World Series.

Gordon signed a one-year contract to return this season, and he never considered opting out when the coronavirus pandemic caused spring training to be halted and forced Major League Baseball to play a dramatically reduced 60-game schedule.

___

More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports