THE YEAR IN REVIEW: HBT’s most commented-upon stories of the year

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It’s the holidays and year-end lists and summaries and things are becoming just as much a part of the holidays as peppermint, mistletoe and passive-aggressive interactions with your family who, despite the fact that you’ve been doing this for five years still asks you “what the plan is” or “what the endgame is” for your writing career. Or maybe that’s just my family. I don’t know.

The point is, over the next few days we’ll be doing some end-of-year type things. Looking back at the good, the bad, the ugly and, more than anything else, the things that are capable of being recapped in list form.

First up: the top 10 most commented-upon stories at HBT for the past year. The stuff that made you angry or excited or snarky or whatever. The stuff that made our comments section live up to the reputation of comments sections all over the Internet, sadly enough. Here they are:

 So, of our top 10 most commented-upon posts, one is about football, one is about commenters themselves, seven are about social/political things and one –one! — is about just baseball.

Man, I really wish you guys would stick to baseball.

 

Nationals to pay minor leaguers $300 — not $400 — per week through June

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The Athletic’s Britt Ghiroli reports that the Nationals will pay their minor leaguers $300 per week through the end of June. MLB agreed to pay all minor leaguers $400 per week through today, May 31. Many teams have extended that by at least a month. Some, like the Marlins, Padres, and Mariners, have committed to paying their minor leaguers beyond that.

Ghiroli also notes that the Nationals cut more than 30 minor leaguers, as there will almost certainly not be a minor league season this year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

It is interesting that the Nationals are only offering $300 per week as opposed to the standard $400 weekly. If we assume that the Nationals’ organization has 275 minor leaguers, they will save $110,000 in August by offering $100 less. The Nationals are coming off of winning a championship. While the Nationals haven’t experienced as much of a boon as other champions due to the unfortunate timing, their owner still has a net worth north of $4 billion. The Nats’ franchise value is approximately $2 billion, per Forbes. No, it’s not all liquid, but $110,000 is change that gets lost between the couch cushions for this and many other franchises.

Players are taking note of which teams take care of their players and other personnel, and which are not. The teams that continued to pay minor leaguers, kept staff paid and on board, and helped in other ways will have a better time going forward of attracting and retaining talent both in terms of players and front office personnel (including scouts). While teams should pay their players out of a sense of morality, there is a competitive advantage to doing so as well.