More from the underbelly of the A-Rod Conspiracy Industrial Complex

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Today Wallace Matthews analyzes the Yankees trade of Martin Prado to the Marlins for, among others, Garrett Jones. He notes that the presence of Jones may reduce the number of at-bats for A-Rod from the DH and/or backup first base slot. Which I think is fair to say is absolutely going to happen.

Of course, it can’t just be a baseball move. It has to be something . . . more sinister:

There is a school of thought that this is all part of a Yankee plan to humiliate Rodriguez to the point that he will quit and leave his money behind, but there’s about as much chance of that as there is of Joe Girardi becoming the front man for a hip-hop group. Still, with no legal recourse to void A-Rod’s contract and apparently little stomach for paying off his contract and releasing him, humiliation may be the only weapon the Yankees have left.

Call me crazy, but maybe rather than scheme and plot to “humiliate” A-Rod, perhaps the Yankees are simply trying to put together the best possible roster they can? One that provides Joe Girardi with the best possible options given the strengths and weaknesses of the team and the uncertainty presented by A-Rod’s age, health and time off? And, if they make enough moves — or if A-Rod shows he can’t help the Yankees win games — they’ll simply DFA him. Indeed, I’d give it even odds at happening before Opening Day at this point.

Or is that naive of me?

In other news, when a writer says “there is a school of thought that . . . ” or “some say that . . .” you can rest assured that it is the writer’s own opinion. And, in this case, the writer definitely comes from a school of thought that is very, very interested in reading too much in to what are pretty simple and sensible baseball moves.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.