Tim Hudson is “pretty sure” he’ll retire after 2015

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Tim Hudson has one year remaining on his contract with the Giants and the 39-year-old right-hander said today that he plans to retire after the season.

Via the Associated Press, here’s what Hudson said during an event at his alma mater, Auburn University:

I have one more year left on my contract, so I’m pretty sure that’s going to be it after this season. I just started my workouts yesterday, which is kind of crazy to me. Just two weeks ago I was still playing and here I am having to get back ready for next season again.

I guess that’s the price you pay when you play that late into the season come playoff time. But I’m going to work my tail off this offseason to get ready to go on to spring training in as good a shape as I can be and hopefully finish (next) season strong. It’s been an unbelievable career for me.

Hudson, who threw 189 innings with a 3.57 ERA in 31 starts, added that winning the World Series this year brings him “some solid closure” to his career after previously never advancing past the first round of the playoffs.

He’ll make $12 million in 2015.

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.