Four NPB pitchers combine to no-hit the MLBers in the Japan Series

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We haven’t been posting about the Japan Series because, well, it’s not really holding any of our interests. The idea is great in theory of course, but it’s just some exhibition games and they’re airing at, like, 4am and even irredeemable morning people like me are having a hard time focusing. We’d probably kill for this sort of thing in January, but right now it’s just hard to focus on it.

But something notable did happen in the this morning’s Game 3: four pitchers from team Japan combined to no-hit the MLB All-Stars.

The pitchers were Takahiro Norimoto, Yuki Nishi, Kazuhisa Makita and Yuji Nishino. The MLB lineup contained six All-Stars including American League batting champ Jose Altuve and NL batting champ Justin Morneau. Robinson Cano was in the game for a time too, but he left after being hit by a pitch in the foot. He’s off for X-Rays now. If we hear anything on that we’ll let you know.

This is not the first no-hitter in Japan Series history. In 1990 Chuck Finley and Randy Johnson combined to no-hit the Japanese players.

The Japanese team’s win puts them up 3-0 in the five-game series. Which means they have won it already, though they do play the whole thing out.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.