Royals likely to decline Billy Butler’s option, but will he re-sign for less?

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It’s not exactly a hot-button topic like whether or not the Giants will re-sign third baseman Pablo Sandoval, but the Royals face a similar decision on designated hitter Billy Butler.

Once upon a time Butler looked likely a long-term building block for the Royals, but now at age 28 his performance has slipped and the team seems likely to decline his $12.5 million option for 2015.

Butler is the longest-tenured Royal at eight seasons and was originally drafted by Kansas City in 2004, but he’s hit just .280 with a .396 slugging percentage and .746 OPS in 313 games since 2013 and for a player with zero defensive or baserunning value that’s simply not worth $12.5 million.

However, last night Butler made it clear that he wants to stay with the Royals no matter what happens regarding his 2015 option:

Even if they decline it, you can still talk. Nothing’s been said. I haven’t been told anything, nor should I. We were focused on the World Series. I bleed Royal blue, and I’m a proven major league player. If it’s not here, it’s somewhere else, but I’d rather it just be here. It’s just the way it is. We’re small market and business is business, but I feel like it’s a little bit more than that here.

Parting ways with Butler would give the Royals a chance to add a bigger power threat to the middle of the lineup. He’s topped 20 homers just once in the past five seasons and has a .449 career slugging percentage while frequently being among the league leaders in grounding into double plays. Of course, breaking up after a decade together can be tough and as recently as 2012 he hit .313 with 29 homers and an .882 OPS.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.