2014 Fielding Bible Award winners announced

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The Fielding Bible Awards are back. And they have an interesting wrinkle this time around.

If you aren’t familiar with the Fielding Bible Awards, just think of them as an alternative to the traditional Rawlings Gold Glove Awards. Voted on by a 12-person panel consisting of some familiar names, including Bill James, Joe Posnanski, Brian Kenny, Rob Neyer, and others, the award aims to identify who was the best defensive player at each position for each season.

The big change this year is the introduction of the multi-position award, which recognizes a brilliant defensive player who plays multiple positions. In order to qualify, a player must have played at least 600 innings across all positions and played no more than 70 percent of those innings at any one position. I think you are going to like their choice.

Here’s the full list of the 10 winners for 2014:

Multi-position –  Lorenzo Cain, Royals
C– Jonathan Lucroy, Brewers
1B – Adrian Gonzalez, Dodgers
2B – Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox
SS – Andrelton Simmons, Braves
3B– Josh Donaldson, Athletics
LF – Alex Gordon, Royals
CF – Juan Lagares, Mets
RF – Jason Heyward, Braves
P – Dallas Keuchel, Astros

It’s hard to quibble with these choices. Six of the 10 are first-time Fielding Bible Award winners, including Cain, Gonzalez, Donaldson, Lagares, Lucroy, and Keuchel. Of course, what’s interesting about Cain is that he wasn’t even a finalist for a Gold Glove Award this year. Too bad.

You can see the full ballot here.

Indians designate Carlos Gonzalez for assignment

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The Indians have designated outfielder Carlos Gonzalez for assignment. This comes after Gonzalez batted a mere .210/.282/.276 over 117 plate appearances in Cleveland. That came after he had to settle for a minor league contract with the Indians in mid-March.

A few years ago Gonzalez was a superstar, winning three Gold Gloves, two Silver Slugger Awards, making the All-Star team three times and coming in third in the MVP balloting once upon a time. That was then, however. His most recent good season came in 2016, when he hit .298/.350/.505 with 25 homers and drove in 100. In 2017 and 2018 he combined to hit .232/.269/.334. Between his falloff in production and the fact that his big numbers of the past were heavily supported by playing at Coors Field, it should not be shocking that he couldn’t make it work in Cleveland.

If he wants to continue his career, he’ll no doubt have to take a minor league gig someplace. Otherwise, this could be the end of the line.