Bumgarner ready to go if needed in Game 7

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Madison Bumgarner is the hot topic at the World Series.

Much of the talk after Kansas City defeated the Giants 10-0 in Game 6 on Tuesday night surrounded not if, but when and how much Bumgarner would pitch in Game 7 on Wednesday.

Two days removed from a 117-pitch shutout effort in Game 5, the Giants ace, who has pitched 47.2 innings this postseason, said he feels better than he has all season.

San Francisco sends veteran Tim Hudson to the mound against Jeremy Guthrie. But Bumgarner joked he feels so good he’s capable of reaching new heights with his pitch count.

“Maybe 200,” Bumgarner said. “I don’t know.”

[RELATED: Silver lining for Giants despite Game 6 blowout]

Manager Bruce Bochy and pitching coach Dave Righetti aren’t about to let that happen.

He’d love to be able to use Bumgarner, who has a 1.13 postseason ERA, without restriction. Bumgarner has dominated Kansas City for 16 innings in the World Series, allowing a run, seven hits and a walk with 13 strikeouts.

But he also recognizes the 25-year-old has already completed 265 innings in 2014, including 217.1 in the regular season.

Still, Bochy won’t shy away from Bumgarner, either.

“If we do use him, how far he could go, Dave Righetti and myself, we’ll watch him and make sure we take care of him,” Bochy said. “This is the last game of the year, so it’s easier to push a guy the last game versus doing it twice.

“I think he could give some work if needed.”

Bay Area native Dan Hayes is the White Sox Insider for CSNChicago.com. Follow him on Twitter @CSNHayes.

Rob Manfred walks back comment about 60-game season

Rob Manfred
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Yesterday, on The Dan Patrick Show, commissioner Rob Manfred stuck his foot in his mouth concerning negotiations with the MLB Players Association, saying, “We weren’t going to play more than 60 games.” The comment was taken poorly because MLB owners, represented by Manfred, and the MLBPA were engaged in protracted negotiations in May and June over the 2020 season. Ultimately they couldn’t come to terms, so Manfred had to set the season as prescribed by the March agreement. In saying, “We weren’t going to play more than 60 games,” Manfred appeared to be in violation of the March agreement, which said the league must use the “best efforts to play as many games as possible.” It also seemed to indicate the owners were negotiating in bad faith with the players.

Per Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY, Manfred walked back his comment on Thursday. Manfred said, “My point was that no matter what happened with the union, the way things unfolded with the second [coronavirus] spike, we would have ended up with only time for 60 games, anyway. As time went on, it became clearer and clearer that the course of the virus was going to dictate how many games we could play.” Manfred added, “As it turned out, the reality was there was only time to play 60 games. If we had started an 82-game season [beginning July 1], we would have had people in Arizona and Florida the time the second spike hit.”

As mentioned yesterday, it is important to view Manfred’s comments through the lens that he represents the owners. The owners wanted a shorter season with the playoffs beginning on time (they also wanted expanded playoffs) because, without fans, they will be making most of their money this year through playoff television revenue. Some thought the owners’ offers to the union represented stall tactics, designed to drag out negotiations as long as possible. Thus, the season begins later, reducing the possible number of regular season games that could be played. In other words, the owners used the virus to their advantage.

Manfred wants the benefit of the doubt with the way fans and the media interpreted his comment, but I’m not so sure he has earned it. This isn’t the first time Manfred has miscommunicated with regard to negotiations. He told the media last month that he had a deal with the union when, in fact, no such deal existed. The MLBPA had to put out a public statement refuting the claim. Before that, Manfred did a complete 180 on the 2020 season, saying on June 10 that there would “100%” be a season. Five days later, he said he was “not confident” there would be a 2020 season. Some have interpreted Manfred’s past comments as a way to galvanize or entice certain owners, who might not have been on the same page about resuming play. There’s a layer beneath the surface to which fans and, to a large extent, the media are not privy.

The likely scenario is that Manfred veered a bit off-script yesterday, realized he gave the union fodder for a grievance, and rushed out to play damage control.