The World Series will likely be Lorde-free

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It’s not just the radio stations playing silly radio station games. Major League Baseball and Royals are not flying Lorde in from New Zealand or wherever she is now to sing her little ditty. From the L.A. Times:

. . . when the Royals provided Major League Baseball with their list of proposed World Series entertainers, Lorde was not among them, said Kevin Uhlich, the Royals’ senior vice president of business operations . . . An MLB spokesman said Monday the league had “no plans at the moment for Lorde to be here at any point.”

I feel like having no plans for Lorde to be at any given place at any given point is the default status for most of us. Maybe let us know if there are such plans, ya know?

Whatever. Everyone quoted in the article is right to note that, apart from the title of the song and the backstory of how she wrote the song, it has absolutely nothing to do with baseball or even with broad themes and emotions even marginally applicable to baseball.

I actually saw Lorde in concert last month and she was surprisingly good, but I feel like baseball and it’s interests would be better served with some pop act that lends itself to a bit more fist-pumping and mup-lighting.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.