The recipe for an unlikely Orioles’ comeback

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As if overcoming a 3-0 deficit to win four consecutive postseason games wasn’t hard enough, the Orioles are going to have to try to do it in four straight days, since Monday’s rainout took away the schedule Thursday travel day.

That’s problematic, since the Orioles have a rotation of six-inning guys and will need to rely heavily on the bullpen to mount a comeback against the Royals. Maybe they’ll survive Game 4, but expecting Andrew Miller, Darren O’Day and Zach Britton to carry the day four times in a row, without any sort of break… well, eventually someone is going to break.

Most likely, it won’t come to that anyway. The Royals are at home these next two days. They had to use their most important relievers in Tuesday’s win, but none threw more than 14 pitches. All will be ready to go again on Wednesday.

But, what if…

The ALCS has been an even matched series thus far, with the Royals just finding a way to win in the end. If there’s a recipe for an Orioles miracle, it would probably involve a late-inning come-from-behind victory against Greg Holland on Wednesday. If they can pull that off — with Kelvin Herrera and Wade Davis also having worked — they’ll have the benefit of the Royals’ bullpen being tired in Thursday’s Game 5.

A stellar outing from Chris Tillman then could send the Orioles back home with new life, ready for Games 6 and 7. Scheduled Royals Game 6 starter Yordano Ventura left Game 2 with shoulder tightness and his velocity was down before his departure. He could be tired and beatable. Toppling him would set the stage for a Game 7 on Saturday in which neither team would have any planned starters available on normal rest (the result of the rainout). Anything could happen that one. Ideally, it’d mean a whole lot of Kevin Gausman for Baltimore, if he hasn’t already been burnt out in the previous victories.

First, there’s Game 4. They’ll be sending seven or eight right-handed hitters up against Jason Vargas, with Delmon Young making his first start of the series. The Orioles have been beaten, but they don’t appear beaten. Let’s see what happens with their backs up against the wall.

The Nationals have inquired about Kris Bryant

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The Washington Nationals, fresh off signing Stephen Strasburg to a $245 million deal, are now turning their attention to their third base hole. Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that they have made inquiries to the Chicago Cubs about trading for Kris Bryant.

Emphasis on the word “inquiry” because it’d be premature for the Cubs to trade Bryant at the moment, even if they are reported to be considering the possibility.

Bryant and the Cubs are awaiting word from an arbitrator about Bryant’s years-old service time grievance. If Bryant wins, he becomes a free agent after the 2020 season. If the Cubs win they control him for two more years. The team may or may not choose to trade him in either case as they are reportedly trying to cut payroll, but the price for him will vary pretty significantly depending on whether or not the acquiring club will receive one or two years of control over the former MVP.

For Washington, this would be a means of replacing free agent third baseman Anthony Rendon. Or, perhaps, the inquiries are a means of creating a tad more leverage for the Nats as they talk to Rendon’s agent about re-signing him.

Which, in the past, the Nats said they could not do if they also re-signed Strasburg, though I suspect that’s just posturing too. They may not want to spend big money to keep their World Series core together, but they can afford it. They’re going to see, I suspect, an eight-figure uptick in revenue by virtue of being the defending World Series champs. They are poised to receive a significant payout as a result of recent rulings in their own multi-year dispute with the Orioles and the MASN network. They are, of course, owned by billionaire real estate moguls. All of that taken together means that, if they choose to, they can bring back Rendon. Assuming he chooses to come back too.

But, if that doesn’t happen, they appear to be giving themselves options at the hot corner.