Dodgers take early 2-0 lead in NLDS Game 2, benefit from reviewed tag play

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The Dodgers pushed across the first run of NLDS Game 2 in the bottom of the third inning against the Cardinals against starter Lance Lynn. Catcher A.J. Ellis led off the inning with a double, and advanced to third base on Zack Greinke’s bloop single to shallow right field.

Dee Gordon went ahead 2-0, then fouled off four consecutive pitches from Lynn before grounding weakly to second baseman Kolten Wong. Wong fielded the ball and rushed towards Greinke to apply the tag before throwing the ball to first baseman Matt Adams in time to complete the double play, or so they thought.

The replay showed Wong tagging Greinke with an empty glove, as he had the baseball in his throwing hand in an attempt to hurry the throw. Manager Don Mattingly, after getting the go-ahead from bench coach Tim Wallach, asked the umpires to review the play. They did, and reversed the call based on the obvious evidence from the replay. Greinke went to second base with the Dodgers ahead 1-0. (The run scoring was never in question, as there were no outs with Gordon at the plate.)

The Dodgers took advantage of the call reversal. After Yasiel Puig struck out for the second out of the inning, Adrian Gonzalez ripped an RBI single to right-center field to score Greinke, putting the Dodgers up 2-0. Matt Kemp flied out to right field to end the inning.

We’re guessing that, even with Greinke on the mound, a two-run lead is far from comfortable for the Dodgers given what happened on Friday night.

Red Sox to activate Dustin Pedroia from disabled list on Friday

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Manager Alex Cora said that second baseman Dustin Pedroia will be activated from the disabled list on Friday, Pete Abraham of The Boston Globe reports.

Pedroia, 34, had cartilage restoration surgery on his left knee in late October. He played in only 105 games last season, batting .293/.369/.392 with seven home runs and 62 RBI in 463 plate appearances. His offensive stats were his worst since an abnormally-bad 2014 campaign.

The 34-15 Red Sox have baseball’s best record. Eduardo Nunez has mostly been handling second base in Pedroia’s place, hitting a disappointing .243/.261/.361 in 177 trips to the plate. He has also, by most metrics, played subpar defense at the position, so getting Pedroia back will be a boon.