Octavio Dotel is retiring after 15 seasons for 13 teams

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Octavio Dotel, who missed all of this season with elbow problems, has decided to retire rather than try another comeback at age 40, according to Chris Cotillo of MLB Daily Dish.

Dotel had a remarkable career, pitching 15 seasons for 13 different teams despite not debuting until age 25, not finding his full-time home in the bullpen until age 27, and often dealing with arm troubles.

Armed with a good fastball and sharp-breaking slider, Dotel went from struggling as a starter to making 724 relief appearances with a 3.32 ERA and .207 opponents’ batting average while racking up 955 strikeouts in 760 innings.

His career strikeout rate of 10.8 per nine innings is the best in the history of baseball for right-handed pitchers with at least 900 innings. Directly behind him on the list are Kerry Wood and Pedro Martinez.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.