Giants take 1-0 lead over the Nationals in the NLDS behind Jake Peavy’s strong outing

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Jake Peavy was no one’s idea of a post-season hero at the time he was traded from the Red Sox to the Giants in late July. The 33-year-old right-hander compiled an ugly 4.72 ERA over 124 innings for the Red Sox, showing further decline in his strikeout and walk rates. The veteran, it appeared, was continuing the downward trend that had been established back in 2010, his first year with the White Sox. The Giants, hungry for starting pitching depth, decided to take a gamble, sending prospects Edwin Escobar and Heath Hembree to Boston for Peavy.

Peavy turned his season around, posting a 2.17 ERA over 12 starts with the Giants in the final two months of the regular season. Though he still didn’t rediscover his swing-and-miss stuff, his control improved immensely and he was much tougher to square up, allowing just three home runs compared to 20 with the Red Sox.

Peavy carried his rediscovered success into the post-season, confounding the Nationals over 5 2/3 innings. He brought a no-hitter into the fifth inning, losing it when Bryce Harper led off the frame with an infield single. It was one of only two hits he would allow on the afternoon. The other was a double to pinch-hitter Nate Schierholtz, leading off the sixth.

The sixth inning was the Nationals’ first taste of an offensive rally, but they were unable to capitalize on it. Following Schierholtz’s double, both Denard Span and Anthony Rendon popped up, failing to advance the runner to third base. Jayson Werth drew a walk, ending Peavy’s solid afternoon.

Javier Lopez came in and walked Adam LaRoche, then gave way to flamethrowing reliever Hunter Strickland, who struck out Ian Desmond on a 100 MPH fastball to end the threat and the inning. Peavy’s line: 5 2/3 innings, two hits, three walks, three strikeouts. But most importantly: zero runs.

Strickland remained in the game in the bottom half of the seventh and the Nationals took advantage. Bryce Harper led off the inning by crushing a Strickland fastball into the upper deck in right field, and Asdrubal Cabrera followed up with a solo home run of his own with one out. That was the extent of the scoring for the Nationals, though.

Sergio Romo got into a bit of hot water in the bottom of the eighth, putting runners on first and second with one out following singles by Anthony Rendon and Adam LaRoche. Romo fanned Ian Desmond on a slider way out of the zone, then got Harper to hit into a fielder’s choice. Santiago Casilla took the hill in the ninth, needing only seven pitches to set the Nationals down in order for the save, preserving the Giants’ 3-2 victory. Peavy was credited with the win, his first in six playoff starts.

Starting Peavy in Game 1 was less-than-ideal for the Giants, but it was necessary after relying on Madison Bumgarner to pitch them past the Pirates in the National League Wild Card game just to have the privilege to oppose the Nationals in the NLDS. It worked out better than the Giants could ever have realistically expected. Tomorrow, the Giants will have to rely on another veteran right-hander as Tim Hudson takes on Jordan Zimmermann, who no-hit the Marlins on the final day of the regular season.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.