A’s will have six months to play the “what if” game

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There was no October… er, September 30 meltdown for the A’s. They blew leads in the ninth and 12th to lose their sudden death game, but it was more about the Royals winning it than the A’s losing it. Except for a couple of error-non-errors from shortstop Jed Lowrie and the unfortunate outfield collision on Eric Hosmer’s triple in the 12th, they played a really good game. They’ll certainly be wondering what might have happened had they played it at full strength, though.

In the third inning Tuesday night, they lost catcher Geovany Soto to a thumb injury, the result of a fluky tag play at home plate after a busted delayed steal from Billy Butler. Soto was the Athletics’ lone hope of controlling the running game. Jon Lester certainly wasn’t going to do it, and Soto offered a stronger arm than Derek Norris behind the plate, so much so that the A’s were willing to pair Soto with Lester after they never worked together during the regular season.

The Royals swiped six bases after Soto departed, four of them coming in the three-run eighth. Their winning run in the 12th came after Norris botched a pitchout, dropping the ball when he had a chance to throw out Christian Colon at second base to preserve the tie and send the game to the 13th.

Oakland also lost Coco Crisp to a hamstring problem in the 11th inning, forcing them to move Sam Fuld to center and install Jonny Gomes in left. It was another obvious blow to the defense, and it proved huge in the 12th, when Eric Hosmer hit a triple to left-center just out of reach of both Fuld and Gomes. Had Fuld been in left instead of running over from center, there’s a realistic chance he would have caught the ball. Hosmer went on to score the tying run on an infield single, and the Royals won the game on Salvador Perez’s shot to left.

With a healthy Soto, there’s a great chance the A’s would have cut Kansas City’s eighth-inning rally short and won in regulation. With a healthy Crisp, they might have closed out the game in the 12th. Without either, they’re looking at another too long winter and a window for contention that could soon close.

Rangers, Padres, White Sox to continue paying minor leaguers

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In March, Major League Baseball agreed to pay minor league players $400 per week while the sport is shut down amid the coronavirus pandemic. That provision is set to expire at the end of May. As Craig noted earlier, the Athletics will not be paying their minor leaguers starting on June 1.

Several teams are doing the right thing, continuing to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week through at least the end of June. Per The Athletic’s Levi Weaver and James Fegan, the Rangers and White Sox will each tack on another month of pay. The Athletic’s Dennis Lin reported earlier that the Padres will pay their players through the end of August. Craig also cited a Baseball America report from this morning, which mentioned that the Marlins will also pay their players through the end of August.

Frankly, if the Marlins can find a way to continue paying their minor league players, then every team should be able to do the same. The Marlins are widely believed to be the least profitable among the 30 major league clubs. Here’s hoping the rest of the league follows the Rangers’, White Sox’s, Padres’, and Marlins’ lead as opposed to the Athletics’.