Glen Perkins has learned his lesson about pitching through an injury

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Athletes take honor in their ability to play through pain, even knowing full well that it’s not only a detriment to their own health and performance, but to the team in general. Twins reliever Glen Perkins, recently shut down with a left forearm strain and nerve irritation in his left elbow, decided to pitch through his discomfort despite showing diminished velocity.

It didn’t work. Perkins allowed runs in five of his six appearances in the month of September, including in each of his last four, culminating when he blew a two-run save on Tuesday. The Twins recently decided to end their left-hander’s season, but the good news is that Perkins won’t need surgery.

Perkins seems to have learned his lesson. Via Mike Berardino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press:

Would that all athletes learned Perkins’ lesson — it’s rarely, if ever, worth it to play through an injury. Perkins ends his 2014 season with 34 saves, a 3.65 ERA, and a 66/11 K/BB ratio in 61 2/3 innings. Perkins signed a four-year, $22.175 million extension with the Twins back in March, and he’ll earn $4.65 million in 2015 before his salary begins to escalate further.

Diamondbacks, T.J. McFarland avoid arbitration

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that the Diamondbacks and reliever T.J. McFarland have avoided arbitration, agreeing on a $1.45 million salary for the 2019 season. McFarland, in his third of four years of arbitration eligibility, filed for $1.675 million while the Diamondbacks countered at $1.275 million. McFarland ended up settling for just under the midpoint of those two figures.

McFarland, 29, was terrific out of the bullpen for the D-Backs last season, finishing with a 2.00 ERA and a 42/22 K/BB ratio in 72 innings. While the lefty may not miss a lot of bats, he does induce quite a few grounders. His 67.9 percent ground ball rate last season was the third highest among relievers with at least 50 innings, trailing only Brad Ziegler (71.1%) and Scott Alexander (70.6%).

McFarland was dominant against left-handed hitters, limiting them to a .388 OPS last season, but the D-Backs deployed him nearly twice as often against right-handed hitters, who posted an aggregate .764 OPS against him. It will be interesting to see if the club decides to use him more as a platoon reliever in 2019.