And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Nationals 3, Braves 0: The Nats clinch their second NL East title in three years and do so in convincing fashion. Tanner Roark tossed seven scoreless innings. Washington got to celebrate on the field and in the visitor’s clubhouse of the team that, theoretically, stood as their biggest challenge this year. It was fun for a bit in the first half, but the  Braves proved to be little if any challenge to the Nationals. Now they set their sights on maintaining the best overall record in the National League and enjoying some home cooking for the playoffs.

Orioles 8, Blue Jays 2: Meanwhile, up the road, the Orioles were clinching as well. It was a bit longer of a time coming for Baltimore, who nabbed their first AL East crown since 1997. As for the game: it was their ninth win in their last 10. Steve Pearce set the tone with a three-run homer in the first. Alejandro De Aza hit a three-run triple. If you live out west or never watch a team other than your team, and if your idea of the Orioles is based on what you read about them in the season previews last March, well, you have a lot of studying to do before they playoffs start.

White Sox 7, Royals 5Twins 4, Tigers 3: Nothing is changed in the Central as both contenders lose. For the Royals, it was an uncharacteristically awful night for bullpen aces Kelvin Herrera and Wade Davis, who have been damn nigh unhittable all year but were beat around by the Sox. For the Tigers, it was an all-too-characteristic bad night for Joe Nathan, who allowed two runs to lose a game that the Tigers had come back to lead in the ninth. Starters Ricky Nolasco and Rick Porcello probably went out for a beer afterwards and complained about bullpens until the bartender told them to move it along because they don’t serve their kind. Meaning, of course, Ricks.

Rangers 6, Athletics 3: Oakland couldn’t create any separation between their wild card pursuers, remaining one up on Kansas City and two up on Seattle. Scott Kazmir’s second half swoon continued, allowing six runs — four earned — and not escaping the fifth inning. Bad Oakland D was on display here. This team will probably make it into the playoffs, and if they do they’ll probably be dangerous, but man this has been a long, limping second half.

Mariners 13, Angels 2: Seattle takes advantage, pulling to within one game. The offense woke up with a six-run sixth inning. In the M’s previous eight games they scored 14 runs. Here, 13. It was an instance where Mike Scioscia’s “give Cory Rasmus a couple of innings and then turn it over to a bullpen committee” approach didn’t work. It’s been a good approach and has helped lessen the sting of losing Garret Richards, but doing that enough times will, occasionally, lead to a game like this. Too many moving parts or whatever.

Pirates 4, Red Sox 0: Charlie Morton returned after coming off the disabled list and he pitched well: five scoreless innings with six strikeouts. The Pirates have won 9 of 11 and maintain their one and a half game lead over the Brewers for the second wild card.

Brewers 3, Cardinals 2: Milwaukee stays alive, as Gomez, Hector knocks in Gomez, Carlos with an RBI single in the 12th. The single was preceded by Carlos Gomez stealing both second base and third base off of Yadier Molina following a walk. Actually, Gomez said afterward that he wasn’t running on Molina, he was running on pitcher Kevin Siegrist, as one times everything off the pitcher. Which is a good point. Still: that’s some pretty major base running. The Brewers stay a game and a half behind the Pirates.

Rockies 10, Dodgers 4: The Rockies ended a seven-game losing streak. Corey Dickerson homered, tripled and drove in four runs. The Dodgers got 16 hits but left way, way too many on.

Giants 2, Diamondbacks 1: Peavy and Posey come through again, as they have so many times in the second half. Peavy allowed one run in seven and two-thirds. Posey had two hits, including a fourth inning solo shot. San Francisco pulls to three back of L.A.

Rays 6, Yankees 1: Derek Jeter got gifts. He also got plunked. Joe Girardi got ejected after that and then Yankees pitcher David Phelps was ejected for throwing inside later. Dugouts emptied but no one here had the ill-will nor the motivation to make this into an actual donnybrook. It’s late in a lost season for everyone. Jake Odorizzi allowed one run and five hits over six innings.

Mets 9, Marlins 1: Two homers and six driven in for Wilmer Flores. Bartolo Colon somehow only allowed one run despite giving up 12 hits in seven and two thirds. That stretches the applicability of the word “scattered.” The judges have said they’d allow it, though. But that we shouldn’t push it.

Cubs 7, Reds 0: Jake Arrieta took a no-hitter into the eighth, allowed only the one hit to Brandon Phillips and struck out 13. The Cubs rocked Johnny Cueto.

Indians 4, Astros 2: Corey Kluber allowed more hits, but he struck out 14 in seven innings of work as the Indians stop their losing streak at four. Yan Gomes hit a two-run homer.

Padres 5, Phillies 4: Alexi Amarista had three hits, including a two-run homer. A.J. Burnett suffered his league-leading 17th loss.

The Players’ Weekend uniforms are terrible

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The Yankees and the Dodgers have a storied World Series history, having met in the Fall Classic 11 times. Part of what made those falls so classic was the livery worn by each club.

The Yankees’ uniforms have gone unchanged since 1936. The Dodgers, though changing cities in 1958, have had the same basic, classic look with only minor derivations for almost as long. You can’t even say the names of these teams without picturing pinstripes, those red Dodgers numbers, both teams’ clean road grays, the Yankees navy and the Dodgers’ Dodger blue.

They looked like a couple of expansion teams last night however, at least sartorially speaking.

As you probably know it’s Players’ Weekend this weekend, and teams all over the league wore either all black or all white with player-chosen nicknames on the back. We’ve had the nicknames for a couple of years now and that’s fine, but the black and white combo is new. It doesn’t look great, frankly. I riffed on that on Twitter yesterday a good bit. But beyond my mere distaste for the ensembles, they present a pretty problematic palette, too.

For one thing the guys in black blend in with the umpires. Quick, look at these infields and tell me who’s playing and who’s officiating:

The white batting helmets look especially bad:

But some guys — like Enrique Hernandez of the Dodgers, realized that pine tar makes the white helmets look super special:

There was also a general issue with the white-on-white uniforms in that it’s rather hard to read the names and the numbers on the backs of the jerseys. This was especially true during the Cubs-Nationals game in the afternoon sunlight. You’ll note this as much bigger problem on Sunday. It’s all rather ironic, of course, that the players have been given the right to put fun, quirky nicknames on the backs of their jerseys but no one can really see them.

The SNY booth was reading many people’s minds last night, noting how much Mad Magazine “Spy vs. Spy” energy this is throwing off:

I’ll also note that if you’re flipping between games or looking at highlights on social media it’s super hard to even tell which team is which just by looking which, you know, is sort of the point of having uniforms in the first place.

I’m glad the players have a weekend in which they’re allowed to wear what they want. I just wish they’d wear something, you know, better.