Let the “Michael Young for Rangers manager” stumping begin

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As soon as Ron Washington stepped down I thought “it’s only a matter of time until someone says Michael Young should be the next Rangers manager.” Out of respect for Wash, I assume, they gave it a week. Now Richard Justice begins the stumping:

Young knows that the game is not easy, and because he had an awareness of the people around him, he would know that every player isn’t going to care as much as he cared. He was a leader in a quiet way, a guy who led more by example, but would also say what needed to be said. He was universally respected by his managers and teammates alike . . .

. . . With Rangers’ home attendance down for a third straight year, with it off almost 700,000 from two years ago, the Rangers need to do more than simply hire a competent manager. They need someone to inspire confidence in fans. Young is the only potential replacement for Washington who could instantly win over the fan base.

While Young would no doubt be respected by players, it’s also the case that he and Jon Daniels clashed on multiple occasions when Young was with the Rangers, with the discord that led to Young’s position-change dramas often being defended by Young partisans as a function of Daniels undercutting Young and not being straight with him. I have no idea if that’s true. For what it’s worth, Justice says Young and Daniels patched things up “at a wedding last summer.”

But in this day and age a GM wants a manager who will be his guy, no questions asked. Not a guy who can appeal to his own constituency in the press or among fans in such a way that, if the GM and he clash, the GM is undermined. That dynamic ended up causing riffs with Nolan Ryan and Daniels. Justice compares Young to Ryan in several places in this column. You think Daniels wants any part of that again?

There is a lot of talk about “optics” and washing away all of the bad news the Rangers have had in the past couple of years. Winning baseball games washes that stuff way more thoroughly than a nice press conference and a few stories about how Michael Young has “come home.”

(thanks to Caheezy for the heads up)

Twins reach historic home run total during 11-4 rout of White Sox

Max Kepler
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The Twins trampled the White Sox on Friday night, cruising to a cool 11-4 lead over their division rivals and collecting their sixth double-digit win of 2019. Even more impressive, they picked up their 99th, 100th, and 101st home runs, a feat that’s rarely been matched in a team’s first 50 games of any given season.

The first homer of the night was delivered by Eddie Rosario in the third inning. Working against a single-run deficit, Rosario lifted an 0-1 fastball from the White Sox’ Reynaldo López, planting it firmly in the left field stands and evening the score, 4-4. Two batters later, Rosario’s solo home run got a sequel: a 398-footer from Miguel Sanó, this one postmarked for the upper deck in left.

In the fourth, now leading 5-4, the Twins saw a third and final homer from the bat of Max Kepler, whose center-field blast traveled a projected 397 feet to give the club a two-run advantage. Per MLB Stats, the Twins’ record — 101 homers in 50 games — stands second only to that of the 1999 Mariners, who managed to club 102 home runs before their 51st game of the season.

While the record has undoubtedly been a team effort, Rosario leads the pack with a team-best 15 homers so far this year, closely followed by C.J. Cron (13), Max Kepler (11), and Jonathan Schoop (10). Sanó, whose solo shot marked the team’s 100th home run of 2019, has just five, though there’s little doubt he’ll reach double digits before the end of the season.

According to MLB.com’s Do-Hyoung Park, the Twins also made it to an even 300 runs scored in 2019, for a satisfying average of six runs per game and a new franchise record (previous high mark: 273 runs scored in 1992). With the win, they improved to 34-16 on the year and continue to hold a comfortable eight-game lead in the AL Central.