And That Happened: Thursday’s scores and highlights

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Yankees 5, Rays 4: Chris Young broke up Alex Cobb’s no hitter in the eighth and then hit a walkoff homer to win the dang thing. A three-run shot with the Yankees down by two. Martin Prado’s two-run homer came right after the no-no was broke up. A game not many people thought the Yankees had a chance to win but, bam, there it is. It’s the sort of thing that is going to keep people saying crazy things like the Yankees have a shot to make the playoffs, even.

Brewers 4, Marlins 2: A win for Milwaukee, but all of it is overshadowed by the awful pitch to the face of Giancarlo Stanton. Everyone pretty much lost it after that happened and it’s not surprising that they did. Here’s hoping the Iron Giant is OK.

Indians 2, Twins 0; Indians 8, Twins 2 : Corey Kluber wins his 15th in game one, getting back on track after some shaky outings. T.J. House takes care of things in the nightcap, tossing seven shutout innings. Carlos Santana homered in both ends of the doubleheader, driving in the only runs in game two.

Nationals 6, Mets 2: Adam LaRoche and Anthony Rendon had two-run homers and Bartolo Colon decided he needed to hit the batters after each of them, leading to his ejection. You been around this game a long time Bartolo: get guys out and cut that crap out.

White Sox 1, Athletics 0: Chris Sale, man. His season has been positively ridiculous. Here he tossed eight shutout innings and lowered his ERA to 1.99. On the year he’s 12-3 with a 192/32 K/BB ratio in 163 innings. He may not get the kind of Cy Young consideration Felix Hernandez gets because he’s played on a losing team and missed some time, but what he’s done while he’s been there has been crazy.

Reds 1, Cardinals 0: Same story applies to Johnny Cueto. He has less of a Cy Young case because, well, there is no argument that makes him better than Clayton Kershaw. But he’s been incredible. Eight shutout innings here, lowering his ERA to 2.15 ERA in a league-leading 222 innings. The Reds take three of four from the Cardinals.

Pirates 4, Phillies 1: Another fantastic pitching performance, this from Francisco Liriano, who struck out 12 in eight shutout innings. Seven of eight for the Pirates, who are separating themselves from the pretenders.

Giants 6, Diamondbacks 2: And those Pirates seem to be on a collision course with the Giants for the wild card game. That is, if the Giants don’t catch the Dodgers. If they played the corpse that is the Arizona Diamonbacks every game they’d be assured of it, because they’d never lose again. Jake Peavy, who has come on like gangbusters, stuck out eight in five and two-thirds. Hunter Pence had a silly RBI single. What a late season surge for the Giants.

Red Sox 6, Royals 3: Liam Hendriks made a spot start for Danny Duffy which is less than ideal. It’s even less ideal than that when the Royals commit three errors behind him in the first four innings of the game.

Angels 7, Rangers 3: Mike Scioscia’s bullpen game-a-week has been interesting. Eight pitches used here may seem nuts, but it’s better than exposing any one pitcher who probably doesn’t have any business pitching a lot of innings, you know, pitch a lot of innings. Indeed, the Angels have given up fewer runs a game since Garrett Richards went down than they were giving up before he did. So someone is doing something right.

 

 

 

Angels release Matt Harvey

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Among several transactions made on Sunday, the Angels announced that pitcher Matt Harvey has been released. The right-hander was designated for assignment on Friday.

Harvey, 30, was hoping to bounce back with the Angels after signing a one-year, $11 million contract in December. It didn’t work out. In 12 starts spanning 59 2/3 innings, Harvey allowed 47 earned runs on 63 hits and 29 walks with 39 strikeouts. Harvey missed time between May 24 and July 12 with an upper back injury.

Since his 2015 campaign with the Mets, after recovering from Tommy John surgery, Harvey has a 5.65 ERA in exactly 400 innings. Given his age, he could still find an opportunity with another team short on pitching depth, but he is running out of leash, as they say.