Jose Iglesias cleared for lower-body workouts

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Jason Beck of MLB.com shares the update

Tigers shortstop Jose Iglesias, whose 2014 season ended in Spring Training when stress fractures were discovered in both legs, received a major go-ahead towards being ready for 2015 when he was cleared for lower-body rehabilitation and conditioning exercises Tuesday.

Iglesias was given that official go-ahead after being examined by Dr. Thomas Clanton of the Steadman Clinic on Wednesday afternoon in Vail, Colorado. An MRI and CT scan both showed significant bone healing.

“This was the best possible news we were looking at,” Tigers head athletic trainer Kevin Rand told reporters on Wednesday evening at Comerica Park. “As far as Dr. Clanton is concerned, it appears the bone [in each leg] has healed, and it’s now time to put stress back on it and see how the bone responds.”

Iglesias, a defensive whiz, should open the 2015 season as Detroit’s starting shortstop.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.