And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

76 Comments

White Sox 5, Athletics 4: This is how a season is woofed away. Not with a bang, but a whimper. The A’s took a 4-3 lead into the ninth, but Eric O’Flaherty gave up a homer to Tyler Flowers which tied the game. Onto extras where, in the twelfth, Jesse Chavez gave up another homer to Flowers. OK, so I guess that was with a bang — two actually — but not from Oakland.

Mariners 4, Astros 1: And I do mean woofed away. As it may potentially be, with the M’s now only a game behind the A’s. Here Brad Miller’s eighth inning triple plated two and then he came in on a subsequent Austin Jackson single. Felix Hernandes tossed six shutout innings but got the no-decision because, well, that’s more in keeping with what has always happened to him as opposed to all the winning he’s done this year.

Blue Jays 8, Cubs 0: Marcus Stroman with The Maddux (i.e. a shuout in under 100 pitches). His took 93 pitches. He allowed three hits and struck out eight against Maddux’s former team.

Tigers 9, Royals 5: A crucial head-to-head series starts with the Tigers on top, pulling to within one game in the Central. A six-run third inning was the difference-maker here. Justin Verlander was OK, allowing four runs in seven innings, but the Tigers will accept OK from him these days. The win was the 9,000th in Tigers franchise history.

Orioles 4, Red Sox 0: The Orioles have a ten-game lead in the East. That’s their largest since they won the pennant in 1979. One guess as to the last time any team had a lead as big in the AL East. Guess all you want, you’ll never get it. The answer: the 1984 Tigers. Which, yes, us old people still remember being in the AL East, but no one else does. [UPDATE: I have no idea whey I said that. It was part of an online conversation that I badly misinterpreted and mangled. Carry on]. Miguel Gonzalez with six and a third shutout innings. Nelson Cruz with a couple of hits.

Dodgers 9, Padres 4: Clayton Kershaw wins his 18th, allowing only one earned run in eight innings and reducing his ERA to a silly 1.67. Carl Crawford hit a three-run homer. But boy, you gotta see those unearned runs.

Mets 3, Rockies 2: Two runs in the ninth as the Mets rally to win it. Curtis Granderson was the engine here, with the RBI triple to plate one of those runs and by coming in to score the second.

Cardinals 5, Reds 0: St. Louis has won their ninth of ten to keep their surge alive. A two-run single for Matt Carpenter broke the scoreless tie in the seventh and a three-run Matt Adams homer broke it wide open in the ninth. Cincinnati’s bullpen has a record of 0-14 since the All-Star break.

Pirates 6, Phillies 4: Jeff Locke allowed one run over seven and struck out nine. Though most of the action took place in the eighth with the Pirates plating four of their six runs and the Phillies three of their four. Starling Marte singled, doubled and homered. Pittsburgh remains in the second wild card slot, a game and a half up on Milwaukee and Atlanta.

Editor’s Note: Hardball Talk’s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $40,000 Fantasy Baseball league for Tuesday night’s MLB games. It’s $25 to join and first prize is $5,500. Starts at 7:05pm ET on TuesdayHere’s the FanDuel link.

Nationals 2, Braves 1: Doug Fister shut the Braves the heck down for seven innings, allowing only two hits. Atlanta still had a shot against the Nats’ bullpen in the eighth, but strikeouts and a foul out by Justin Upton with men on killed any hope. Braves couldn’t hit their way out of a paper bag. No one in Atlanta seems to care all that much, so I’m struggling to think why I should at this point. Oh, Atlanta. What an uninspiring bunch.

Angels 12, Indians 3: Jered Weaver wins his 16th, which leads the AL. Albert Pujols was 3 for 5 with a homer and three driven in. Kole Calhoun hit a two-run homer and David Freese had a three-run shot of his own in the makeup game.

Marlins 6, Brewers 4: The Brewers continue to skid out of control. A Marlins slugger hit a monster home run. But this time it wasn’t Giancarlo Stanton. Watch Marcell Ozuna go way, way out of here. Off the dang scoreboard:

[mlbvideo id=”36068201″ width=”600″ height=”336″ /]

 

 

 

 

 

Rumor: MLB execs discussing 100-game season that would begin July 1

David Price and Mookie Betts
Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
7 Comments

Matt Spiegel of 670 The Score Chicago heard from a source that Major League Baseball executives have been discussing a 100-game season that would begin on July 1 and conclude on October 15. It would essentially pick up the second half schedule, eliminating the All-Star Game while hosting the World Series at a neutral warm-weather stadium — ideally Dodger Stadium.

In the event the Dodgers, who won 106 games last year, made it all the way through the playoffs, the World Series would be hosted in Anaheim or San Diego. The earlier rounds of the playoffs would be played in the cities of the teams involved, which might be tough since the postseason would extend into November.

Spiegel went on to describe this vision as “an absolute best case scenario,” and that’s accurate. In order for the regular season to begin on July 1, the players would need to have several weeks if not a full month prior to get back into playing shape — more or less an abbreviated second spring training. And that would mean the U.S. having made significant progress against the virus by way of herd immunity or a vaccine, which would allow for nonessential businesses to resume operations. The U.S., sadly, is faring not so well compared to other nations around the world for a variety of reasons, but all of which point to a return to normalcy by the summer seeming rather unlikely.

Regardless, the league does have to plan for the potential of being able to start the regular season this summer just in case things really do break right and offer that opportunity. Commissioner Rob Manfred has stated multiple times about the league’s need to be creative, referring to ideas like playing deep into the fall, changing up the location of games, playing without fans in attendance, etc. This rumor certainly fits the “creative” mold.