What are the best MVP pairings of all time?

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While thinking about Clayton Kershaw as the leading NL MVP candidate and Mike Trout as the leading AL MVP candidate it occurred to me that this could be one of the best MVP “pairings” ever.

I’m talking about the players’ standing in baseball history, rather than in their specific MVP-winning season. So, in a purely hypothetical world the best possible MVP “pairing” would be whoever you happen to believe are the two greatest players of all time. It could be, say, Babe Ruth and Barry Bonds. Or maybe Willie Mays and Ted Williams. Something like that. You get the idea, right?

Now, obviously Trout is only 23 years old and even Kershaw is only 26 years old, but few players their respective ages have ever accomplished what they have and in a couple decades it’s possible they’ll both be considered inner-circle Hall of Famers. But setting Kershaw and Trout aside, what are the best pairings ever to be named MVP in the same season?

After looking at the list of MVP winners here are my top five contenders for best MVP pairings ever:

1946: Ted Williams, Stan Musial

1957: Mickey Mantle, Hank Aaron

1986: Roger Clemens, Mike Schmidt

1990: Barry Bonds, Rickey Henderson

2003: Barry Bonds, Alex Rodriguez

There are obviously a ton of other great pairings that could possibly crack the top five. Take a look at the full list and chime in with your choices.

Gio González exits NLCS Game 4 start after twisting ankle

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Brewers starter Gio González was forced to exit his NLCS Game 4 start against the Dodgers in the second inning after twisting his left ankle attempting to field a comebacker hit by Yasiel Puig. González leaped, deflected the ball and twisted his ankle landing, then went after the ball but Puig reached base easily.

The Brewers’ trainer and manager Craig Counsell came out to the mound to observe González throwing some practice pitches. He was clearly in pain but was allowed to stay in. He threw one pitch to Austin Barnes and very visibly grimaced after completing his wind-up. Counsell came back out to the mound and took a visibly upset González out of the game. Freddy Peralta came in relief to finish out the at-bat. González probably shouldn’t have been allowed to stay in the game in the first place, but sometimes a player’s competitiveness is enough to convince a manager and a trainer.

Upon entering, Peralta issued a walk to Austin Barnes, then got the first out when Rich Hill laid down a mediocre bunt, allowing Peralta to get the lead runner at third base. Peralta struck out Chris Taylor and walked Justin Turner to load the bases with two outs. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts opted to pinch-hit for David Freese with Max Muncy, who struck out looking. Peralta was somehow able to slither out of the jam.

Gonzalez pitched two innings in NLCS Game 1 on Friday. He was quite good after joining the Brewers in a late-August trade with the Nationals, compiling a 2.13 regular season ERA in five starts with his new club. The Brewers will likely provide an update on his status after Tuesday night’s game.