What are the best MVP pairings of all time?

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While thinking about Clayton Kershaw as the leading NL MVP candidate and Mike Trout as the leading AL MVP candidate it occurred to me that this could be one of the best MVP “pairings” ever.

I’m talking about the players’ standing in baseball history, rather than in their specific MVP-winning season. So, in a purely hypothetical world the best possible MVP “pairing” would be whoever you happen to believe are the two greatest players of all time. It could be, say, Babe Ruth and Barry Bonds. Or maybe Willie Mays and Ted Williams. Something like that. You get the idea, right?

Now, obviously Trout is only 23 years old and even Kershaw is only 26 years old, but few players their respective ages have ever accomplished what they have and in a couple decades it’s possible they’ll both be considered inner-circle Hall of Famers. But setting Kershaw and Trout aside, what are the best pairings ever to be named MVP in the same season?

After looking at the list of MVP winners here are my top five contenders for best MVP pairings ever:

1946: Ted Williams, Stan Musial

1957: Mickey Mantle, Hank Aaron

1986: Roger Clemens, Mike Schmidt

1990: Barry Bonds, Rickey Henderson

2003: Barry Bonds, Alex Rodriguez

There are obviously a ton of other great pairings that could possibly crack the top five. Take a look at the full list and chime in with your choices.

The Giants might be ready to part ways with Hunter Pence

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Alex Pavlovic of NBC Sports Bay Area hints that the Giants may be done with outfielder Hunter Pence. It’s not clear just how seriously the club is contemplating such a decision, but there are six days remaining on Pence’s rehab assignment, at which point they’ll be able to recall him, reassign him to the minors or release him.

The 35-year-old outfielder has struggled to make a full recovery after spraining his right thumb during the first week of the season. Pence bounced back for a 17-game run with the Giants in April, during which he slashed a meager .172/.197/.190 with one double and one stolen base in 61 plate appearances, but was eventually placed on the disabled list with recurring soreness in his finger. He currently sports a promising .318/.359/.388 batting line with four extra-base hits (including a grand slam) over 92 PA in Triple-A Sacramento.

Despite his recent resurgence in Triple-A, the Giants may not need the additional outfield depth just yet. Mac Williamson, who was recalled in the wake of Pence’s DL assignment, has already cemented the starting role in left field and is off to a strong start at the plate as well. Of course, if the Giants decide to say a premature goodbye to their veteran outfielder (who, it should be said, helped them to two World Series championships over the last seven seasons), it’ll cost them the remaining balance on his $18.5 million salary for 2018.