Behind the scenes of Major League Baseball’s move toward greater inclusion of the LGBT community

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In July, Major League Baseball hired former player Billy Bean as the first Ambassador for Inclusion. His job: to work with major and minor league clubs to encourage equal opportunity in accordance with the joint MLB-MLBPA Workplace Code of Conduct, which itself was designed to make baseball more welcoming and inclusive of the LGBT community and to help put an end to sexism, homophobia and prejudice within the world of baseball.

“Ambassador of Inclusion” is not the most conventional title. Indeed, it’s one which, if you’re wearing your cynical cap, you might take as some sort of tokenism. A “Look! We hired a gay former player! Can’t get on our case!” kind of thing.

As Ken Rosenthal reports today, however, it wasn’t that at all. Rosenthal writes about how Major League Baseball came to the conclusion that it needed to be proactive in this arena and that hiring Billy Bean was the right guy for the job. It’s a good read, and I heartily recommend it.

 

Chris Paddack loses no-hit bid in eighth inning vs. Marlins

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Update (9:16 PM ET): Aaaaaand it’s over. Just like that. Starlin Castro led off the eighth inning with a solo home run to left field. That ends the shutout bid as well, obviously.

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Padres starter Chris Paddack has kept the Marlins hitless through seven innings on Wednesday evening in Miami. The right-hander has allowed two base runners on a throwing error and a walk while striking out seven on 82 pitches.

The Padres’ offense provided Paddack with three runs of support, all coming in the fourth on Greg Garcia‘s RBI single and a two-run home run by Austin Hedges.

Paddack, 23, entered Wednesday’s start carrying a 2.84 ERA with an 87/18 K/BB ratio across 82 1/3 innings in his rookie campaign.

Among all 30 teams, the Padres are the only one without a no-hitter. They came into the league in 1969. The Marlins were last victims of a no-hitter on September 28, 2014 when Jordan Zimmermann — then with the Nationals — accomplished the feat.