Troy Tulowitzki says he’ll retire before he switches positions

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Patrick Saunders of the Denver Post writes about Troy Tulowitzki and his plethora of injuries over the years. The sorts of injuries which, historically speaking, tend to cause players to have to move from more demanding defensive positions to less demanding ones. And shortstop is pretty darn demanding. Here’s what Tulo says about the possibility of having to change positions:

“No, I won’t move,” he said in a phone interview. “I will retire before I move.”

Not to third base? Not to first base, a position that could save him from wear and tear and possibly prolong his career?

“No. It’s just who I am, it’s what I do, it’s what I have dreamed of as a kid,” said Tulowitzki, 29. “It’s all I know and it’s all I’ve ever worked for. So I guess when you have a dream and you accomplish it and someone tries to take it away from you … it wouldn’t be worth it for me to try and move somewhere else.”

We all had dreams when we were kids. I was going to be a sports writer — wait, bad example.

Point is, if the time comes when the Rockies or whoever employs Tulowitzki decide that his highest and best use is as, say, a second or third baseman, such an attitude probably won’t play well. The only guy around who is allowed to play shortstop years after better options presented themselves for his team is Derek Jeter. And he had four World Series rings before that became an issue. More often than not, the Michael Young situation applies: you may want to play short, but it’s a team game and even the big stars move off short when better options are available.

Zach Davies replaces Gio Gonzalez on the Brewers roster

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Major League Baseball just announced that it has approved a roster substitution for the Milwaukee Brewers due to the ankle injury sustained by Gio Gonzalez: right-handed pitcher Zach Davies will take his place. In accordance with league rules, Gonzalez will be ineligible to return if the Brewers make it to the World Series.

That rule is designed to prevent roster gamesmanship such as having a pitcher fake an injury after he’s done being used in an effort to give a team a fresh arm in a short series. A second layer on that is an independent consult with the league, which may approve or disapprove the request based on the specific facts and circumstances of the case. In this case, Dr. Gary Green, MLB’s Medical Director, confirmed Gonzalez’s injury after communicating with the Brewers’ evaluating physician. Not that anyone can really suggest that Gonzalez was faking. The dude’s ankle went sideways.

That being said, this is a benefit to the Brewers at least for the short term. Davies did not have a fantastic season, going 2-7 with a 4.77 ERA in 13 starts and failing to make the Brewers’ initial postseason roster, but he is fresh — he hasn’t pitched since September 28 — which could prove very useful for Craig Counsell and the Brewers after last night’s 13-inning game.