What’s wrong with Koji Uehara?

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Red Sox closer Koji Uehara has been human of late, blowing back-to-back saves and allowing a total of seven runs in his previous four appearances, which has people wondering if the 39-year-old right-hander is wearing down.

However, after last night’s blown save Uehara told Rob Bradford of WEEI.com that “it’s nothing about fatigue” and then replied “still, I don’t think that’s the case” when told he’s approaching 150 total innings since the beginning of last season.

Red Sox manager John Farrell took a similar stance, saying the team is “being very conscious of the frequency of the use” but has no plans to shut him down.

Even with his recent struggles Uehara has a 2.25 ERA and spectacular 73/8 K/BB ratio in 60 innings overall this season, which are incredible numbers even if they pale in comparison to his ridiculous 2013 season totals.

Tom Ricketts says the Cubs don’t have any more money

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Cubs owner Tom Ricketts met the media in Mesa, Arizona today and said a couple of things that were fun.

First, he addressed the controversy that arose earlier this month when emails of his father’s — family patriarch Joe Ricketts — were leaked, showing him forwarding and approvingly commenting on racist jokes. Ricketts apologized for those serving as a “distraction” for the Cubs which, OK. He also said “Those aren’t the values our family was raised with… I never heard my father say anything remotely racist.” If you choose to believe that a 77-year-old conservative guy who loves racist emails — who once spearheaded an anti-Obama ad campaign that required a “literate African-American” as its spokesman — hasn’t said racist stuff a-plenty, that’s between you and your credulity.

More relevant to the 2019 Cubs is this:

The Cubs aren’t in the same position as some other contenders in that (a) they don’t have a cheap payroll; and (b) are not obvious candidates for the big free agents like Harper or Machado, but I still find that comment pretty rich for an owner of one of baseball’s marquee franchises in a non-salary cap league. If nothing else, it’s an admission by Ricketts that he, like the other owners, consider the Luxury Tax to be a defacto salary cap.