Kevin Towers says he and Tony La Russa are getting along great

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Most people think that Kevin Towers is a goner after the season, what with the lack of success of the Dbacks, several player moves which have not worked out too well and the fact that ownership brought in Tony La Russa and created a job for him that is above Towers in the pecking order.

But if Towers is feeling the heat, he’s not showing it. Steve Gilbert of MLB.com has a Q&A up with Towers about all things Dbacks today, and one of his questions is about the La Russa situation:

MLB.com: Tony La Russa has said recently that there are a lot of good things going on in the organization, and it seems like you two have developed a good rapport so far.

Towers: He’s been great. It’s nice to have a guy that’s been as successful in uniform around. Our dialogue has been good. I mean he’s a baseball guy, he’s easy to talk to. It’s nice to be able to pick his brain. I always wanted to pick his brain when he was in the other dugout with the Cardinals. Now when you have him on the same team, it’s very valuable — not just to me but the entire organization to have someone with his knowledge and success here.

He notes at the end that, yes, his situation is sort of up in the air. But I guess if he is canned, at least he’s had a few good months of baseball talk with a Hall of Famer.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.