Nationals call up Nate Schierholtz, option Michael Taylor

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Outfielder Nate Schierholtz has joined the Nationals for Saturday afternoon’s match-up against the Giants, getting the call-up from Triple-A Syracuse, per CSN Washington’s Mark Zuckerman. Schierholtz was released by the Cubs on August 13 and joined the Nationals as a free agent on August 18, reporting to Syracuse for four games. Nate McLouth was transferred to the 60-day disabled list to make room on the 40-man roster for Schierholtz, also per Zuckerman. The Nationals optioned Michael Taylor back to Syracuse to create 25-man roster space.

Schierholtz provides a left-handed bat off of the bench for the NL East-leading Nationals. The 30-year-old has struggled this season, hitting only six home runs with 33 RBI and a .192/.240/.300 slash line.

However, over his career, Schierholtz has been relatively productive against right-handed pitching. He has a career .722 OPS against right-handers compared to .650 against southpaws.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.