David Price threw a one-hitter against the Rays. And lost.

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Man, that’s a tough one. Former Ray David Price, facing his old mates, was absolutely dealing today. He pitched eight innings and allowed only one hit. Yet he still lost, 1-0.

The hit was a Brandon Guyer triple in the first inning which scored Ben Zobrist. The run was unearned, however, as Zobrist reached on an Eugenio Suarez error. Price didn’t allow another hit after that. He didn’t walk a batter all game and no one else reached on an error.

Our Matthew Pouliot just ran some Baseball-Reference.com inquiries and found that the Rays were just the third team to win a game with one hit and without drawing any walks since 1914. If you cancel out the walks qualifier, they are the 65th team to do it since 1914. Although it has been done four times in 2014 alone. The Padres have done it twice. Year of the pitcher, my friends.

You lose those games when your hitters are totally tied up, and the Tigers hitters were. First by Alex Cobb, who shut out Detroit for seven innings, himself allowing only two hits. Brad Boxberger and Jake McGee finished it off. The Tigers got four hits and drew two walks in the game — offensive explosion! — but couldn’t string anything together.

Like the Yankees-Astros game, this one was quick. A mere two hours and thirty-four minutes. Major League Baseball wants to speed up the pace of play? Heck, just make every game a day game on getaway day with solid pitchers on the bump. That’ll speed things right the heck up.

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.