Always be prepared: Royals backup catcher hits two homers off the bench

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The fates are smiling on the Kansas City Royals these days. In addition to winning like crazy and taking over first place in the AL Central, they’re doing just fine even if key players go down.

Last night catcher Salvador Perez left the game in the seventh inning with right knee discomfort. That’s a bad thing. But then backup Erik Kratz entered the game and hit two solo home runs in his only two plate appearances.  The first home run extended the Royals’ lead to 4-0 in the seventh, and his second came in the ninth inning to make it a 6-1 game. Which was necessary, as the Twins mounted a mini-rally in the ninth, falling short.

After the game, Kratz had this to say:

“You put your work in before the game as a bench guy to be ready to go in,” Kratz said. “Some people could say well, Salvi plays every day, so why not take a day off? In my opinion, what’s the point of taking a day off if that might be the day you come in and play?”

While this runs somewhat counter to one of my own favorite dynamics in life — sometimes being utterly unprepared is totally thrilling — it is probably the better approach to take.

Meanwhile, Perez’s removal from the game is said to be precautionary. He’s day-to-day.

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

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FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.