Freddie Freeman mad that GN’R’s “Welcome to the Jungle” didn’t play on throwback night

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On Saturday the Braves did a throwback night to 1914. As part of it they nixed all of the loud music from over the P.A. including walkup music for the hitters and run-in music for closer Craig Kimbrel, relying on organ music instead. Kimbrel’s usual jam is “Welcome to the Jungle” by Guns N’ Roses.

Not hearing that when Kimbrel came in to protect a one-run lead in the ninth really bothered Braves’ first baseman Freddie Freeman. From the AJC:

“My issue is when, I don’t mind using the uniform, I love the throw-back uniform, but when the atmosphere is taken out of the game,” Freeman said. “Fans are coming here to have an experience and there is nothing on the Jumbotron, no music is playing. I’m looking in the stands and people’s heads are down. It kind of takes the energy out of the stadium, especially when the best closer in the game comes in and there are not flames (on the scoreboard), nothing like that.”

I’m with you, Freddie. I mean, without flames on the Jumbotron and some GN’R blaring, it’s really not even baseball. And really, doesn’t anyone remember 1914 Braves hitter Possum Whitted coming up to this jock jam of the day?

Dudes: between the Braves announcers complaining about Bryce Harper all the time and Freeman finding reason to whine about this sort of thing on a night they beat the best team in baseball, it’s a real drag to root for the Braves these days.

 

Cardinals extend José Martínez through 2020

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First baseman/outfielder José Martínez agreed to a two-year contract extension with the Cardinals on Saturday, per a team announcement. MLB Network’s Jon Heyman reports that Martínez will receive $3.25 million in the deal plus incentives if he earns a more stable place within the starting lineup.

Martínez, 30, played 887 games in the minors before making his major-league debut with the Cardinals at the tail end of the 2016 season. The veteran first baseman has been nothing but productive in the three years since his debut, however, and turned in a career-best performance in 2018 after slashing .305/.364/.457 with 17 home runs, an .821 OPS, and 2.3 fWAR through 590 plate appearances. While he brings some positional flexibility to the table, he’ll be forced to compete against Dexter Fowler and Tyler O'Neill for a full-time gig in right field this year, as Paul Goldschmidt currently has a lock on first base.

According to Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the extension wasn’t solely precipitated by Martínez’s productivity in the majors, but by a competing offer from an unnamed Japanese team over the offseason. Goold adds that Martínez would have earned “significantly more than he would in the majors” had the club sold his rights. In the end, they ultimately elected to ink him to a more lucrative deal themselves. He’ll be eligible for arbitration in 2020.