Mariners move past Tigers into second AL Wild Card spot

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After losing their grip on the division lead to the Royals earlier this week, the Tigers have now fallen behind the Mariners for the second Wild Card spot in the American League.

The Mariners defeated the Tigers 7-2 last night at Comerica Park in Detroit to extend their winning streak to five games. James Paxton tossed six innings of one-run ball in the victory while Robinson Cano went 2-for-4 with his 11th home run of the season. Rick Porcello struggled in the loss, giving up six runs (five earned) on 10 hits over six innings.

Losers of seven out of their last 10, the Tigers are currently 1 1/2 games behind the Royals in the American League Central and a half-game behind the Mariners for the second Wild Card spot. Still, there’s a long way to go in the season and Tigers manager Brad Ausmus told Jason Beck of MLB.com that this isn’t the time to panic.

“I’d much rather be in first place up by 15 games, but that’s not the case,” manager Brad Ausmus said. “We’re just going to keep going. There’s a ton of baseball left. We didn’t win tonight, but we can’t change it, so we’ll come back tomorrow against a very tough pitcher. But luckily for us, they’re going against a tough pitcher as well.”

The matchup Ausmus was alluding to is David Price vs. Felix Hernandez, which should be a lot of fun to watch later tonight.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.