Here’s today’s dose of barfy Derek Jeter sentiment

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Kevin Kernan of the New York Post gives us one of your more barf-inducing pieces of Jeter-worship in a year that has already seen many (and which will see many, many more over the next month and a half):

It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter.

The way the Yankees are playing, there will be no October in Jeter’s final season . . . At the age of 40, Jeter was supposed to go out the right way, playing October baseball and letting the chips fall where they may . . .It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter . . . It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter.

Those last two refrains of “It can’t end like this for Derek Jeter” are what sends this over the top. Three total, which turn a column about Jeter’s October exploits into a fanboy bit of hand-wringing. Or is it wishing? Or maybe praying? To be honest I have no idea what this is all about. I’m not sure if Kernan — who normally does not tend to skew sentimental — is merely trying to serve the Yankee homers who do or if he’s actually letting his guard down and is getting genuinely verklempt.

Either way, he would have done well to explain to us why Jeter is so damn special that he deserves to go to the playoffs when so many other greats did not get to end their careers on high notes. Indeed, you can probably count the ones who did on one hand. Babe Ruth quit in May while playing for a team that lost 115 games. Mickey Mantle’s last year saw the Yankees finish in 5th place. Yogi Berra ended his playing days with a 112-loss Mets team. Ted Williams finished with a great personal season, but on a team that lost 89 games.

That’s usually how it goes in baseball. Why Derek Jeter should be an exception is beyond me. That people argue with a straight face that he somehow deserves to be is what aggravates the holy hell out of people about folks in the media who write about Derek Jeter.

A wise man once said that everything ends badly. Otherwise it wouldn’t end. Maybe that’s not 100% true, but it’s true often enough that wishing otherwise is just that. Wishing. And wishing is not a great look for the sporting press.

Video reviews overturn 42% rate; Boston most successful

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NEW YORK (AP) Video reviews overturned 42.4% of calls checked during Major League Baseball’s shortened regular season, down slightly from 44% in 2019.

Boston was the most successful team, gaining overturned calls on 10 of 13 challenges for 76.9%. The Chicago White Sox were second, successful on eight of 11 challenges for 72.7%, followed by Kansas City at seven of 10 (70%).

Pittsburgh was the least successful at 2 of 11 (18.2%), and Toronto was 7 of 25 (28%).

Minnesota had the most challenges with 28 and was successful on nine (32.1%). The New York Yankees and Milwaukee tied for the fewest with nine each; the Yankees were successful on five (55.6%) and the Brewers three (33.3%).

MLB said Tuesday there were 468 manager challenges and 58 crew chief reviews among 526 total reviews during 898 games. The average time of a review was 1 minute, 25 seconds, up from 1:16 the previous season, when there 1,186 manager challenges and 170 crew chief reviews among 1,356 reviews during 2,429 games.

This year’s replays had 104 calls confirmed (19.8%), 181 that stood (34.4%) and 223 overturned. An additional 12 calls (2.3%) were for rules checks and six (1.1%) for recording keeping.

In 2019 there were 277 calls confirmed (12.5%), 463 that stood (34.1%) and 597 overturned. An additional nine calls (0.7%) were for rules checks and 10 (0.7%) for record keeping.

Expanded video review started in 2014.