Rob Manfred voted in as new MLB commissioner

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UPDATE: Manfred’s election was just made official in a press conference. Mark Zuckerman of CSNWashington.com has some quotes:

6:16 p.m. ET: Manfred ended up being elected unanimously, which is a positive thing from an optics perspective, even though there was some objection.

6:04 p.m. ET: After a long day of deliberations in Baltimore, MLB owners have finally voted in Rob Manfred as Bud Selig’s successor as MLB commissioner.

Manfred, 55, will be the 10th commissioner in MLB history. Selig, who has served as commissioner since 1992, will retire when his contract expires on January 25, 2015.

Manfred was one of three candidates at the start of today, along with MLB’s Executive Vice President of Business Tom Brosnan and Red Sox Chairman Tom Werner. However, Brosnan dropped out of the race around midday. Manfred received 22 out of 30 votes in the balloting earlier this afternoon, leaving him one vote short of election, but the owners (likely with some serious convincing from Selig) were eventually able to bridge the gap and reach a consensus. Per the New York Daily News, the Blue Jays, Red Sox, White Sox, Nationals, Angels, Athletics, Diamondbacks, and Reds were the teams who initially backed Werner over Manfred.

Selig’s preferred successor, Manfred has been involved with baseball since 1987. He became MLB’s executive vice president for labor relations and human resources in 1998 before his role was expanded to include executive vice president of economics and league affairs in 2012. He was promoted the position of chief operating officer last September, reporting directly to Selig, a move which essentially signified that he was the heir apparent for the job. During his time with MLB, he has helped lead negotiations for three collective bargaining agreements (2002, 2006, and 2011) as well as the joint drug agreement.

Hunter Pence is mashing for the Rangers

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Hunter Pence was thought to be on his way to retirement after a lackluster 2018 season with the Giants. As he entered his mid-30’s, Pence spent a considerable amount of time on the injured list, playing in 389 out of 648 possible regular season games with the Giants from 2015-18.

Pence, however, kept his career going, inking a minor league deal with the Rangers in February. He performed very well in spring training, earning a spot on the Opening Day roster. Pence hasn’t stopped hitting.

Entering Monday night’s game against the Mariners, Pence was batting .299/.358/.619 with eight home runs and 28 RBI in 109 plate appearances, mostly as a DH. Statcast agrees that Pence has been mashing the ball. He has an average exit velocity of 93.3 MPH this season, which would obliterate his marks in each of the previous four seasons since Statcast became a thing. His career average exit velocity is 89.8 MPH. He has “barreled” the ball 10.4 percent of the time, well above his 6.2 percent average.

What Pence did to a baseball in the seventh inning of Monday’s game, then, shouldn’t come as a surprise.

That’s No. 9 on the year for Pence. Statcast measured it at 449 feet and 108.3 MPH off the bat. Not only is Pence not retired, he may be a lucrative trade chip for the Rangers leading up to the trade deadline at the end of July.