Baseball is dying, you guys

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It takes a special kind of logic to start your segment with a callback to the 1994 strike — the darkest moment in recent baseball history — and then make a full-throated argument that baseball today is in dire trouble. I mean, you think one would at least note that baseball has achieved labor peace, instituted the strongest drug testing regime in U.S. sports and has increased revenues something like 800% since then, but maybe that just slipped everyone’s mind:

To be fair: I  am on board with concern about the demographics of baseball fandom. It is somewhat concerning that the audience for the game is getting older. Baseball worries about that too and they’ve actually been working on it. Time will tell if they figure that out. It’s also worth wondering and maybe worrying about who the next commissioner will be. The current battle to replace Bud Selig has one faction which seems to want to take us back to the days when owners and players were at odds and things like salary caps were discussed in polite company. If that happens, we could find ourselves back in the bad old days again.

But to claim that baseball “depends” on local revenue as if that were a bad thing and to cite the Q-ratings of various athletes as if that is some gauge of health is a lot of effort to get around the fact that baseball is doing really darn well these days. Way better than it was doing in the mid-90s, that’s for sure.

Braves ace Mike Soroka out for year with torn Achilles

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Atlanta Braves ace Mike Soroka is out for the season after tearing his right Achilles tendon Monday night against the New York Mets.

Soroka was hurt in the third inning after delivering a pitch to J.D. Davis, who grounded the ball toward first baseman Freddie Freeman.

Soroka broke toward first to cover the bag, only to go down on his first step off the mound. The right-hander knew right away it was a devastating injury, one that ensures he won’t be back on the mound until 2021.

“It’s a freak thing that happened,” manager Brian Snitker said, delivering the grim news after the Braves lost 7-2 to the Mets. “I’m sorry it did.”

Soroka yelled in obvious pain and tried to walk gingerly for a couple of steps before dropping to his knees. He couldn’t put any weight on the leg as he was helped toward the clubhouse with the assistance of Snitker and a trainer.

It was a major blow to the two-time defending NL East champion Braves, who had won five straight despite struggling to put together an effective rotation.

“Somebody else is going to get an opportunity,” Snitker said. “Things like that happen. These guys will regroup. Somebody is going to get an opportunity to do something really good. Our young guys are going to continue to get better. We’re going to be fine.”

Soroka, who turns 23 on Tuesday, made his first opening day start last month after going 13-4 with a dazzling 2.68 ERA in 2019 to finish second in NL Rookie of the Year balloting and sixth for the Cy Young Award.

Soroka was making his third start of the season. He came in having allowed just two earned runs over 11 1/3 innings but struggled against the Mets, giving up three hits and four walks. He was charged with four earned runs in 2 1/3 innings, the second-shortest outing of his career.

Unfortunately for Soroka, he won’t get a chance to make up for it this season.