White Sox great Paul Konerko feeling “lucky” as 18-year career winds down

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White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko isn’t getting a city-by-city farewell tour like Derek Jeter, but the 38-year-old six-time All-Star is retiring after 18 seasons in the majors.

Konerko has struggled in his final season, hitting .236 with five homers and a .650 OPS in 64 games as a part-timer after 15 years as an everyday player, so he’ll finish just short of reaching 450 homers and 2,500 hits for his career.

Konerko spoke to Scott Merkin of MLB.com about how he feels with things winding down:

I can say this statement: I will be an ex-baseball player next month. It’s the truth. Since the All-Star break, it’s becoming more real. It’s there, you know. You can feel it coming. But like everything, I’m trying to spin it to where it’s not a bad thing.

It’s just part of the life cycle of the player. I’ve been lucky to play for a long time. I’m trying not to look at it as a sad occasion. I hope nobody else is. I’m graduating on to other things and there’s a time for this. Every player has to go through this stuff. I’m lucky because mine came a lot later than most. I feel lucky for that.

Konerko had a helluva career, especially considering he was once written off as a prospect bust after struggling in his first few cracks at the big leagues with the Dodgers. He’s played more games in a White Sox uniform than everyone except Hall of Famer Luke Appling, hit more home runs in a White Sox uniform than everyone except Hall of Famer Frank Thomas, and ranks 10th in franchise history in Wins Above Replacement.

Brewers sign Freddy Peralta to a multi-year deal

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Ken Rosenthal reports that the Milwaukee Brewers have agreed to a five-year $15.5 million deal with pitcher Freddy Peralta. There are two club options as well, which would nearly double the overall value of the contract if exercised.

Peralta, who turns 24 in June, has amazing stuff. He has struggled so far, having posted a 4.79 ERA in 163.1 major league innings across two seasons, but people who follow him closely believe that he’s primed for a breakthrough. For now he’s a reliever — he’ll likely be a multi-inning fireman for the 2020 season — but he has was mostly a starter in his rookie year before assuming swingman duties last season. He could become one again if things break right in his development. Sort of a Brandon Woodruff track.

If that happens the Brewers will, quite obviously, have a bargain on their hands. If not, at least Peralta has some security on his.