PBS’ “Antiques Roadshow” comes across $1 million in 1870s Boston baseball memorabilia

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According to the Associated Press, the PBS series “Antiques Roadshow” appraised $1 million worth of 1870s Boston baseball memorabilia during their taping this past weekend in New York City. The collection, which included signatures and rare baseball cards from Boston Red Stockings players, is the largest sports memorabilia find in the 19-year history of the show.

Pretty cool stuff. Check out more details below:

The collection was brought to an “Antiques Roadshow” taping Saturday in New York City. The owner inherited it from her great-great-grandmother, who ran a Boston boarding house where the team lived in 1871-72, PBS said.

The owner’s identity was kept private for security reasons, PBS said Monday. The collection had not been formally valued before but the owner had once received a $5,000 offer, PBS said.

According to “Antiques Roadshow” appraiser Leila Dunbar, the “crown jewel” of the items is a May 1871 letter to the Boston landlady that includes notes from three future Hall of Fame members: Albert Spalding, the future sporting good magnate, and brothers Harry and George Wright. The letter included the players’ appreciation for their host’s cooking.

The episode is set to air in 2015.

MLB has more evidence against Addison Russell than just his ex-wife’s blog post

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Major League Baseball put Cubs shortstop Addison Russell on administrative leave pursuant to its domestic violence policy the other day. The thought at the time was that the move was made solely because Russell’s ex-wife, Melisa Reidy, had written a blog post reiterating past claims of domestic violence. As Ken Rosenthal reports, however, that’s not all they had:

The post alone would not have been enough for baseball to force Russell off the field under its joint domestic violence policy with the players’ union. The league had additional credible information, according to sources familiar with its investigation.

The league’s investigation includes interviews with Reidy and numerous other witnesses, and with officials gathering additional information since Russell went on leave, sources said.

Reidy’s allegations alone, once assessed by MLB, would likely be enough to warrant Russell a suspension. That there is more out there would seem to make the case against him even stronger. The upshot: I think it’s extraordinarily unlikely that Russell will be back with the Cubs this year.