Twins calling up pitching prospect Trevor May

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For a while now Minnesotans have been wondering why the Twins haven’t called up 24-year-old pitching prospects Trevor May and Alex Meyer yet. Meyer remains at Triple-A, but Seth Stohs of Twins Daily reports that the Twins will call up May to debut tomorrow against the A’s.

May was acquired from the Phillies in the Ben Revere trade two offseasons ago and repeated Double-A last season before taking a big step forward at Triple-A this year. The hard-throwing right-hander has a 2.93 ERA and 91/37 K/BB ratio in 95 innings, getting his walk rate below 4.0 for the first time in his career.

May isn’t considered an elite prospect–Meyer is the higher-upside arm, long term–but he’s a potential mid-rotation starter and keeping him in the minors to throw nearly 400 innings between Double-A and Triple-A seemed odd considering he’s 45 days from turning 25 years old and the Twins’ rotation has been terrible for years.

He also gets a tough first assignment on the road against an A’s team that has the highest-scoring lineup in all of baseball, but for Twins fans it’ll sure beat watching more of Kris Johnson or Logan Darnell or whichever other non-prospects were options to make the start.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.