Mike Scioscia and the Angels are “concerned” about C.J. Wilson

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Angels left-hander C.J. Wilson has allowed 10 runs in seven innings since returning from a month on the disabled list with hip and ankle injuries.

Wilson looked bad last night against the Dodgers and manager Mike Scioscia told Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times:

This is probably the worst C.J. has struggled since he’s been a starting pitcher, so naturally, you’re concerned. There’s certainly been some head-scratching over his last seven or eight starts. But seeing how hard he works, seeing that it doesn’t look like it’s anything physical, we’re very confident he’s going to get back on that beam and do what we need him to do.

Wilson had a 3.34 ERA on June 19. Since then he’s allowed 32 runs in 24 innings with a 21/14 K/BB ratio and .394 opponents’ batting average.

He originally went on the disabled list with an ankle injury, but then said he discovered while rehabbing that he’d been pitching through a hip issue that had hurt his performance. If the Angels had any appealing fallback options Wilson might already be booted from the rotation, but his job appears to be safe unless general manager Jerry Dipoto can swing a waiver wire trade.

Wilson is under contract for $18 million next season and $20 million in 2016 as part of a five-year, $77.5 million deal.

Yoenis Cespedes may need season-ending surgery

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Yoenis Cespedes is facing potential season-ending surgery, the outfielder told reporters following the Mets’ 7-5 win over the Yankees on Friday. Newly-returned from the disabled list after rehabbing a hip flexor strain and quad tightness, Cespedes appeared to be back to his old self after going 2-for-4 with a walk, base hit, and home run (his ninth of the year) during Friday’s series opener, but later remarked that he was suffering from calcification in both of his heels.

The only remedy, it appears, is a surgery that would require anywhere from 8-10 months of recovery. Should he elect to undergo the procedure now, it goes without saying that he won’t be able to return to the field before end of the regular season. On the other hand, if he postpones the surgery until the offseason, he could miss the first half of the Mets’ run in 2019.

The pain doesn’t seem to be debilitating, at least for the time being, but Cespedes added that any discomfort in his heels causes him to stand, walk, and run differently, which presents a definite problem if the club intends to ramp up his workload going forward. The Mets have yet to announce a final decision regarding any surgical procedure, though they will bench the outfielder for Saturday’s matinee against the Yankees. Following yesterday’s impressive performance, Cespedes is currently¬†batting .262/.325/.496 on the year with 15 extra-base hits, three stolen bases, and an .821 OPS through 157 PA.