MLB tells the Dodgers to turn off their bubble machine

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The Dodgers have been doing something silly this year. Fun silly. The kind of silly that, if you’re not invested in the opposing team’s fortunes, probably makes you smile. They’ve had a little battery-powered bubble machine in the dugout and someone turns it on and they do little dances when they hit home runs.

Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports, however, that Major League Baseball has told the Dodgers to cut it out:

Before Tuesday’s game against the Angels at Dodger Stadium, Joe Torre, Major League Baseball executive vice president, advised the Dodgers to stop using the machine . . . The bubble machine was back Wednesday, at Angel Stadium . . . Did the Dodgers negotiate a compromise with MLB, or did they unilaterally decide to bring back the bubble machine?

No one is giving any comment about it, Shaikin says, so it’s unclear whether Joe Torre relented or whether the Dodgers are being bubble-blowing badboys.

I hope MLB relented here, because as far as home run celebrations go, this is pretty darn tame. It’s off-the-field for one thing. It’s not taunting anyone. In an age where fireworks go off, complicated handshakes and gestures are flashed and music is blared through the ballpark at ear-splitting levels every time a home team player hits a homer, I’m not sure what would possess anyone to target a child’s bubble machine.

This game is fun, people. Let’s have some fun out there.

Major League Baseball told Kolten Wong to ditch Hawaii tribute sleeve

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Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Major League Baseball has told Cardinals infielder Kolten Wong that he has to get rid of the colorful arm sleeve he’s been wearing, pictured above, that pays tribute to his native Hawaii and seeks to raise awareness of recovery efforts from the destruction caused by the erupting Mount Kilauea.

Goold:

[Wong] has been notified by Major League Baseball that he will face a fine if he continues to wear an unapproved sleeve that features Hawaiian emblem. Wong said he will stash the sleeve, like Jose Martinez had to do with his Venezuelan-flag sleeve, and find other ways to call attention to his home island.

Willson Contreras was likewise told to ditch his Venezuela sleeve.

None of these guys are being singled out, it seems. Rather, this is all part of a wider sweep Major League Baseball is making with respect to the uniformity of uniforms. As Goold notes at the end of his piece, however, MLB has no problem whatsoever with players wearing a non-uniform article of underclothing as long as it’s from an MLB corporate sponsor. Such as this sleeve worn by Marcell Ozuna, and supplied by Nike that, last I checked, were not in keeping with the traditional St. Louis Cardinals livery:

ST. LOUIS, MO – MAY 22: Marcell Ozuna #23 of the St. Louis Cardinals celebrates after recording his third hit of the game against the Kansas City Royals in the fifth inning at Busch Stadium on May 22, 2018 in St. Louis, Missouri. (Photo by Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images)

If Nike was trying to get people to buy Hawaii or Venezuela compression sleeves, I’m sure there would be no issue here. They’re not, however, and it seems like creating awareness and support for people suffering from natural, political and humanitarian disasters do not impress the powers that be nearly as much.