Tony La Russa defends the Dbacks’ plunking of Andrew McCutchen. And it’s ridiculous.

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Tony La Russa was asked about the Dbacks-McCutchen affair. Tony La Russa, it seems, wants to blame the victim. Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic reports:

“I don’t see where the Diamondbacks should catch all this (expletive) they’re catching,” La Russa said . . . La Russa believes the Pirates were still responsible regardless of intent.

The crux of his argument lies in what he believes to be the Pirates’ pitching philosophy. They don’t just pitch inside, La Russa said. They pitch up and in. And by choosing to do so, they have to live with the consequences.

Which is idiotic baloney. Since when are there consequences for accidents? And indeed, the hitting of Paul Goldschmidt was clearly an accident and there is no one in their right mind who can say it wasn’t. To claim, then, that the Pirates were to blame for this is nonsensical.

If, however, his view is that the mere fact of pitching up and in is the offense — not hitting Goldschmidt – then congratulations, Tony, you have added yet another page to the overflowing Unwritten Rules Book you authored when you were manager of the Cardinals. Thou Shalt Not Pitch Up and In can go right next to Thou Shalt Not Be Angry With Oneself For Messing Up and It Is Perfectly Alright For Pitchers To Shout Expletives At Hitters When They Do Not Succeed. There are scores of others too. They make no sense and are often contradictory, but the common thread is that whatever team Tony La Russa happens to be working for at the time is correct and the other team is disrespectful and wrong.

This is pure bull and La Russa either knows it is or thinks we’re all idiots. Or maybe both. I have no idea. All I do know is that Major League Baseball’s failure to discipline Randall Delgado or Kirk GIbson over Saturday’s incident is a disgrace.

CC Sabathia hopes to play one more year

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Back in May, Yankees starter CC Sabathia said he’d retire if the Yankees won the World Series. That still may be the plan, but he recently told MLB.com that he’s going to try to pitch in 2019, health willing:

“I’m start to start. I go out one start and feel like I can pitch five more years. I go out another start and I’m done. But if I can stay healthy — if my knee holds up — hopefully I’ll play one more.”

Sabathia is enjoying a nice late-career renaissance, having transformed himself from the dominant lefty he used to be to a crafty one over the past several seasons. Sabathia will turn 38 on Saturday, but he’s having another solid season. He has a 3.51 ERA and 1.27 WHIP over 18 starts.

Will a World Series decide whether he hangs ’em up? Will his knee? Guess we’ll know by November.