Tony La Russa defends the Dbacks’ plunking of Andrew McCutchen. And it’s ridiculous.

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Tony La Russa was asked about the Dbacks-McCutchen affair. Tony La Russa, it seems, wants to blame the victim. Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic reports:

“I don’t see where the Diamondbacks should catch all this (expletive) they’re catching,” La Russa said . . . La Russa believes the Pirates were still responsible regardless of intent.

The crux of his argument lies in what he believes to be the Pirates’ pitching philosophy. They don’t just pitch inside, La Russa said. They pitch up and in. And by choosing to do so, they have to live with the consequences.

Which is idiotic baloney. Since when are there consequences for accidents? And indeed, the hitting of Paul Goldschmidt was clearly an accident and there is no one in their right mind who can say it wasn’t. To claim, then, that the Pirates were to blame for this is nonsensical.

If, however, his view is that the mere fact of pitching up and in is the offense — not hitting Goldschmidt – then congratulations, Tony, you have added yet another page to the overflowing Unwritten Rules Book you authored when you were manager of the Cardinals. Thou Shalt Not Pitch Up and In can go right next to Thou Shalt Not Be Angry With Oneself For Messing Up and It Is Perfectly Alright For Pitchers To Shout Expletives At Hitters When They Do Not Succeed. There are scores of others too. They make no sense and are often contradictory, but the common thread is that whatever team Tony La Russa happens to be working for at the time is correct and the other team is disrespectful and wrong.

This is pure bull and La Russa either knows it is or thinks we’re all idiots. Or maybe both. I have no idea. All I do know is that Major League Baseball’s failure to discipline Randall Delgado or Kirk GIbson over Saturday’s incident is a disgrace.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.