Meanwhile, Kevin Mitchell allegedly decapitated his girlfriend’s cat in the 1980s.

39 Comments

I was a kid in the 80s and I all I really remember about Kevin Mitchell were his baseball cards, his on-field exploits and the random things like that bare-handed catch, his multiple position switches, is prodigious weight gain and stuff like that. I certainly didn’t know anything about his life or what he was like as a person. You really didn’t know that stuff about anyone back then.

So I missed this thing about where he allegedly decapitated his girlfriend’s cat. Doc Gooden wrote about it in his autobiography in 1999, but I didn’t read that. Darryl Strawberry talked to HuffPostLive yesterday, however, and it came up:

“That’s a pretty good story. I think that’s pretty accurate,” Strawberry told host Marc Lamont Hill. “Kevin Mitchell did do that. Kevin Mitchell, he’s a different type of guy. Great guy, super teammate…I guess he figured that the girlfriend was acting a little crazy, so I’ll kill her cat.”

So I tweet about it just now out of shock, and then someone sends me a link to a story from October 1989 about how Mitchell used to eat Vicks VapoRup. Like actually ate it. With his mouth and stuff.

Next time someone says the players today aren’t like they used to be, think of Kevin Mitchell and then thank God Almighty that that’s the case.

He gone! Hawk Harrelson called his last game yesterday

Getty Images
4 Comments

Ken Harrelson has been broadcasting for decades but yesterday was his last one. As of today the Hawk has hung up his mic and entered retirement. He gone!

Harrelson, 77, who played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He was also the White Sox’ general manager for a single season in the mid-80s. That didn’t go well — he famously fired Tony La Russa and Dave Dombrowski and traded away a young Bobby Bonilla, but his career as a broadcaster went swimmingly.

Harrelson served as a Red Sox broadcaster from 1975 through 1981. Despite his reputation as an unrepentant homer for his White Sox — who he called “the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them — he was actually fired as a Red Sox broadcaster for being critical of ownership. He then embarked on his first stint with the White Sox before his move into the front office, worked as a Yankees broadcaster from 1987-88 and worked games for NBC’s Game of the Week in the mid-1980s as well. He then returned to call games for the White Sox in 1990 and the rest is history.

Hawk will still be a team ambassador for Chicago so he not totally gone, but the White Sox broadcast booth is entering a new era.