Video: The Dbacks win in a controversial walkoff

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Watch how the Diamondbacks beat the Pirates yesterday afternoon. Specifically, watch Nick Ahmed’s left arm reach up to block the relay throw that would’ve likely completed an inning-ending double play rather than allow the winning run to score:

Rule 7.09 controls here. Subsection (f) says:

If, in the judgment of the umpire, a batter-runner willfully and deliberately interferes with a batted ball or a fielder in the act of fielding a batted ball, with the obvious intent to break up a double play, the ball is dead; the umpire shall call the batter-runner out for interference and shall also call out the runner who had advanced closest to the home plate regardless where the double play might have been possible. In no event shall bases be run because of such interference.

I realize a lot of runners put their hands up when they slide, but (a) it’s usually both hands and it’s usually in a manner which is to balance them in the air, not a one-armed grab like Ahmed’s here; and (b) combined with the way in which he clearly moved off the baseline and toward the fielder, it was pretty clear that he was trying to break up the double play. But it is a judgment call, so it’s not like it was reviewable.

Here’s Umpire: Ron Kulpa’s explanation of the judgment made:

It has to have been willful and deliberate with obvious intent to break up a double play. The guy has to do something obviously, willfully, intentionally to break up that double play. Guys slide into second base all the time with their hands up.”

Tip your cap to Ahmed for selling it. And ask yourself whether Kirk Gibson and the Dbacks would’ve thought it was a swell play if the situation was reversed. Or, alternatively, whether they would’ve talked about it being bush league and maybe thrown at someone the next time they met.

 

Shohei Ohtani no longer facing Masahiro Tanaka on Sunday at Yankee Stadium

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Shohei Ohtani has essentially become the Angels’ designated Sunday starting pitcher, but Angels manager Mike Scioscia announced Thursday morning that the 23-year-old two-way Japanese star will be skipped in the rotation this weekend at Yankee Stadium for “workload management” purposes.

Ohtani is fine to continue hitting, so there’s no sense of any physical ailment.

This decision will rob us — and the Japanese media — of a showdown between Ohtani and countrymate Masahiro Tanaka. And for that we are rather devastated, but you can understand the Angels’ concerns about overuse.

Ohtani has registered a 3.35 ERA, 1.066 WHIP, and 52/14 K/BB ratio through his first 40 1/3 innings (seven starts) as a major league pitcher and he’s slashing .308/.364/.582 with six home runs and 19 RBI in 26 games as a part-time DH.